As an association and as an industry, we have many milestones and achievements to celebrate. On these pages, read about the vision of the six printed circuit board manufacturers that came together to create the Institute of Printed Circuits in the fall of 1957. Since that day, IPC has been dedicated to removing supply chain obstacles, creating industry standards, and supporting the advancement of the industry.

No matter what changes lay ahead, the strength of our volunteer leadership and commitment to serve the needs of our membership will continue to be the hallmark of IPC for many years to come.

History/EVOLUTION of IPC's Name

IPC International, Inc. is the legal name of the association, but it is commonly known and referred to as IPC.  In 2020, our Board selected "Build Electronics Better" as the perfect complement to our name because it expresses IPC's mission of networking and technical exchange as well as emphasizing the manufacturing aspect of electronics.

The correct way to refer to IPC in a document is either as IPC or IPC International, Inc.

Before today there have been several iterations of the name of the organization.

IPC was founded in 1957 as the Institute for Printed Circuits. As more electronics assembly companies became involved with the association, the name was changed to the Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits. By the 1990s, most people in the industry could not remember the full name and/or didn't agree on what the words in the name meant.

Old IPC logo 1000

In 1999, IPC changed its name from Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits to IPC. Members expressed overwhelming approval for keeping the initials IPC. Research indicated that there was no one word or expression that adequately describes IPC's constituency - OEMs, board manufacturers, electronics manufacturing services companies and their suppliers. To avoid another awkward name or a name that excludes any of our members, the IPC Board of Directors agreed to make IPC the formal name of the organization.

From 1999 to 2019, IPC's name was accompanied by an identity statement, "Association Connecting Electronics Industries."

 

 

IPC Timeline
1957-1966

1957-1966 Highlights

  • IPC is founded. Ray Pritchard is hired as executive director.
  • First official IPC meeting takes place
  • Publishes How to Design and Specify Printed Circuits
  • Initiates the first round robin test program
  • Starts monthly statistical program for PWB manufacturers
  • Opens membership to OEMs and government agencies
  • Publishes first IPC standard
  • Publishes IPC-A-600, Acceptability of Printed Wiring Boards
  • Establishes the President's Award
  • Membership opens to overseas companies

1957

In 1957, a new industry is struggling for identity. Etched printed wiring is emerging as a new technology, but there is confusion regarding the process and its potential. Independent printed wiring board (PWB) manufacturers hold several meetings throughout the year to discuss ideas for promoting the growth of their new industry.

That autumn, representatives from six of the major independent PWB manufacturers meet in Chicago to officially form a trade association they call the "The Institute of Printed Circuits." At this meeting, they select Ray Pritchard as executive director and outline the following objectives:

  • Promoting an awareness of the attributes of PWBs versus hand wiring.
  • Developing standards and specifications to provide realistic yardsticks for manufacturers and users to move forward in utilizing products of the new industry.
  • Offering a variety of forums where the industry can exchange information on the technology.
  • Providing the industry with meaningful statistical data on the market and cost studies.
  • IPC's first office is established at 27 E. Monroe Street in Chicago.
Seated: Al Hughes, Electralab; Robert Swiggett, Photocircuits; William McGinley, Methode. Standing: Dick Zens, Printed Electronics Corporation; and Carl Clayton, Tingstol. Also in attendance at this initial meeting: Ray Pritchard, thereafter named the Executive Director of IPC; Gene Jones, Printed Electronics Corporation; and George Hart and Stewart Fansteel, Graphik Circuits Division of United Carr.
Seated: Al Hughes, Electralab; Robert Swiggett, Photocircuits; William McGinley, Methode. Standing: Dick Zens, Printed Electronics Corporation; and Carl Clayton, Tingstol. Also in attendance at this initial meeting: Ray Pritchard, thereafter named the Executive Director of IPC; Gene Jones, Printed Electronics Corporation; and George Hart and Stewart Fansteel, Graphik Circuits Division of United Carr.

1958

An announcement of an organizational meeting in New York is sent to all known PWB manufacturers and suppliers. Forty-one individuals, representing 27 companies, attend. At this session, attendees outline their ideas for plans and programs for the new association and sign up all interested companies.

  • The book How to Design and Specify Printed Circuits is published and eventually sells more than 25,000 copies.
  • A round robin test program is initiated, which will compare plated-through holes with eyelets and grommets.
  • A monthly statistical program for PWB manufacturers begins.
  • Membership is opened to users (OEMs).

1959

The development of the market for "printed circuits" is impeded by Zenith, whose advertising claims that their television sets contain "no printed circuits." IPC cooperates with the National Association of Television Repairmen to undertake a survey, which indicates that printed circuits are indeed reliable.

Later in the year, IPC holds a meeting in New York with representatives from RCA, Westinghouse, and Sylvania to develop a cooperative program to educate users to the advantages of using printed circuits. As the program develops, Zenith drops its advertising slogan and, as a result, IPC does not proceed with the cooperative education program.

  • The first analysis of "costs and profits" in the PWB industry is published.
  • Complimentary memberships are offered to representatives of government agencies involved in preparing standards and specifications.
IPC sponsorship of a Reliability Seminar on Printed Circuit Boards in TV Applications. Seated left to right: Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; John Currier, New England Laminates; and Frank Moch, a representative from NATESA, who reported on the survey results indicating reliability data.
IPC sponsorship of a Reliability Seminar on Printed Circuit Boards in TV Applications. Seated left to right: Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; John Currier, New England Laminates; and Frank Moch, a representative from NATESA, who reported on the survey results indicating reliability data.

1960

By 1960, IPC's semiannual meetings are the focal point of IPC activity. With the new and growing technology, there is a need for an exchange of ideas. IPC encourages the best and the brightest from member companies to present papers at seminars and committee meetings. At this time, more than 100 members are attending the semiannual meetings to share ideas and to work at developing new standards and specifications.

  • The initial standard IPC-D-300, Dimensions and Tolerances for Single- and Double-Sided PWBs, is printed.
  • IPC Technical Review (now IPC Review) is published for IPC members.
  • IPC cooperates with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on standards development.
Chairmen of the IPC technical committees. Left to right: L.A. Gunsaulus, Photocircuits Corp., Dimensional Tolerances Committee; C.G. Kepple, Motorola, Inc., Committee on Repairability; E.E. Wright, Bell Laboratories, Through Connection Commmittee, and J.E. Currier, New England Laminates Company, Raw Materials Committee.
Chairmen of the IPC technical committees. Left to right: L.A. Gunsaulus, Photocircuits Corp., Dimensional Tolerances Committee; C.G. Kepple, Motorola, Inc., Committee on Repairability; E.E. Wright, Bell Laboratories, Through Connection Commmittee, and J.E. Currier, New England Laminates Company, Raw Materials Committee.

1961

Technology exchange continues to be important to IPC members and plated-through holes are of major importance in expanding the applications for PWBs.

  • IPC releases the movie The Printed Circuit Storywhich is made available to members to promote their products.
  • The first detailed market study is completed, which reveals:
    • $ 50 million sales by independents (merchant) PWB manufacturers
    • $ 80 million worth of PWBs produced by OEMs
    • $130 million total U.S. PWB Market

Independent PWB manufacturers report operating at 60 percent of capacity; 55 percent of their production is for government/military applications.

Speakers at IPC's Fall Technical Symposium. Seated left to right: W.D. Fuller, Lockheed Electronics Co.; J. M. Rausch, Bell Telephone Laboratories; and Oscar Vance, Burroughs Corp. Standing: D.F. Pennie, Remington Rand Univac Division; G.B. Devey, Spraugue Electric Co.; and R.G. Zensa, Elecrtalab Printed Electronics Inc.
Speakers at IPC's Fall Technical Symposium. Seated left to right: W.D. Fuller, Lockheed Electronics Co.; J. M. Rausch, Bell Telephone Laboratories; and Oscar Vance, Burroughs Corp. Standing: D.F. Pennie, Remington Rand Univac Division; G.B. Devey, Spraugue Electric Co.; and R.G. Zensa, Elecrtalab Printed Electronics Inc.

1962

  • A committee is created to write standards for flexible flat cables.
  • A new committee is formed to develop data on the solderability of printed circuit boards.
  • A joint working group is established with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association and American Society for Testing and Materials to develop data on punching and shearing laminates.
  • A new committee is set up to study multilayer PWBs.
R.L. Swiggett (left) receiving a plaque from W.J. McGinley in recognition of Swiggett's leadership and distinguished service as IPC President in 1961 and 1962.
R.L. Swiggett (left) receiving a plaque from W.J. McGinley in recognition of Swiggett's leadership and distinguished service as IPC President in 1961 and 1962.

1963

By 1963, IPC leadership, with the development of many new committees, subcommittees, and working groups, recognizes the need for better coordination in the standards development process. IPC forms a Technical Planning and Standards Coordinating Committee to oversee technical coordination and make recommendations to the Board of Directors.

  • A comprehensive numbering system is established to identify IPC standards.
  • A Technical Manual is printed, which contains all standards and specifications published by IPC.
  • The first Wage Rate and Fringe Benefits Survey of PWB Manufacturers is published.
  • IPC moves its offices to 3525 Peterson Road in Chicago.
First members of the Standards Coordinating Committee. Seated: Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta; Gene Szukalski, RCA. Standing: Lynn Gunsaulus, Photocircuits; Hugh Medford, Westinghouse Electric; Stark Roberts, IBM; and Dean Stephenson, Amphenol.
First members of the Standards Coordinating Committee. Seated: Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta; Gene Szukalski, RCA. Standing: Lynn Gunsaulus, Photocircuits; Hugh Medford, Westinghouse Electric; Stark Roberts, IBM; and Dean Stephenson, Amphenol.

1964

IPC publishes the first version of IPC-A-600, Acceptability of Printed Boards. This document is still the main source of visual support for the bare board acceptability requirements contained in the IPC-6010 series, and has been revised and updated seven times since 1964.

  • A joint IPC/Government Specifications Steering Committee is formed to coordinate IPC specifications with military specifications.
  • A Raw Materials Roundtable is initiated where members can discuss any problems pertaining to raw materials used in processing PWBs.
 Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta, chairman of the IPC-A-600 committee, with Ken Varker, IBM (left) and Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits (right.)
Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta, chairman of the IPC-A-600 committee, with Ken Varker, IBM (left) and Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits (right.)

1965

One of the year's highlights is a plant visit to the IBM facility in Endicott, New York. The tour is part of an IPC seminar on numerically controlled manufacturing systems sponsored by the IPC Multilayer Committee. Nearly 100 IPC members travel to Endicott to participate in the program.

  • The American Association of Association Executives (ASAE) presents its Grand Award to IPC. This award is the highest honor given by ASAE for association programming.
  • The first Round Robin Test Program to evaluate the state-of-the-art technology of multilayer PWBs is completed.
  • IPC concludes a study of various freight rates being applied to products in our industry.
Fall Meeting in Chicago
Fall Meeting in Chicago. Click on the picture to see it larger.

1966

In 1966, the President's Award is established so that at the conclusion of each two-year term, the outgoing IPC president (now IPC chairman of the Board) can recognize those individuals who have made outstanding contributions to IPC.

  • Membership is opened to overseas companies.
  • A comprehensive multilayer handbook is published.
  • IPC sponsors a marketing seminar to discuss "The Five-Year Outlook for Printed Circuit Applications."
From left Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; Dieter Bergman, Philco-Ford;  George Messner, PCK Technology and Gerry Ginsberg, Philco-Ford.
From left Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; Dieter Bergman, Philco-Ford;  George Messner, PCK Technology and Gerry Ginsberg, Philco-Ford.
1967-1976

1967-1976 Highlights

  • IPC becomes active in the IEC
  • Opens membership to colleges and universities
  • Establishes Technical Activities Executive Committee (TAEC)
  • Forms Committee Chairmen Council (CCC)
  • Publishes first study of the US market for PWBs
  • Launches Technology Marketing Research Council (TMRC)
  • Sponsors the first IPC workshop

1967

  • IPC decides to become more active in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and names Ken Varker, IBM, as an official member of the IEC Printed Circuit Board Committee.
  • A special liaison membership for colleges and universities is established.
IPC Packaging Trends Seminar. From left to right: Robert Swiggett, Photocircuits; Joseph Chenail, Hybrid Integrated Circuits; Jack Kilby, inventor of the semiconductor, Dieter Bergman, Philco Corp.; and C.P. Hill, IBM.
IPC Packaging Trends Seminar. From left to right: Robert Swiggett, Photocircuits; Joseph Chenail, Hybrid Integrated Circuits; Jack Kilby, inventor of the semiconductor, Dieter Bergman, Philco Corp.; and C.P. Hill, IBM.

1968

By 1968, IPC committees, subcommittees, and working groups have expanded to the point where certain technologies are of concern to more than one group. As a result, IPC's technical committee structure is revised.

  • The Standards Coordinating Committee is enlarged to include the chairmen of all general technical committees, and the name is changed to the Technical Activities Executive Committee (TAEC). Bernie Kessler, Mica, is named the first chairman of the TAEC.

    In addition, a new group, the Committee Chairmen Council (CCC), is formed to include all general committee, subcommittee, and working group chairmen. This IPC Technical Committee structure still exists today.

    • IPC releases the Component Mounting Handbook.
    • IPC leadership agrees that all future IPC documents will contain metric equivalents.
Key contributors to the Component Mounting Handbook. Left to right, Hank Koons, Bell Labs; John DeVore, General Electric; Bert Isaacson, Electralab; and Bob Wathen, Fairchild. Co-chairman Dominick Dellisante, Picatinny Arsenal, is not shown.
Key contributors to the Component Mounting Handbook. Left to right, Hank Koons, Bell Labs; John DeVore, General Electric; Bert Isaacson, Electralab; and Bob Wathen, Fairchild. Co-chairman Dominick Dellisante, Picatinny Arsenal, is not shown.

1969

In 1969, IPC publishes its first study of the U.S. market for PWBs. The data shows the following types of PWBs produced by U.S. manufacturers:

Two-sided rigid PWBs 54%
One-sided rigid PWBs 23%
Multilayer PWBs 20%
Flexible circuitry 3%
Total 100%
  • A new program is initiated to study potential air and water pollution problems in the PWB industry.
  • The first IPC film festival is held: Movies produced by IPC members detailing their technology or markets are presented at semiannual meetings.
  • IPC moves its offices to 1717 Howard Street, Evanston, Illinois.
 Shown above are a group of experts from government and industry who met at the U.S. Defense Electronics Supply Center (DESC) to develop a specification for copper foil. Front and center, Bernie Alzua, Mica, who served as the chairman of this joint effort.
Shown above are a group of experts from government and industry who met at the U.S. Defense Electronics Supply Center (DESC) to develop a specification for copper foil. Front and center, Bernie Alzua, Mica, who served as the chairman of this joint effort.

1970

IPC forms the Environmental Protection Committee with Glenn Affleck, Hewlett Packard, and Jim Rogers, Raytheon, serving as co-chairmen. This committee is now called the Environmental, Health and Safety Committee and continues to be very active in support of the membership.

  • The second Round Robin Test Program to evaluate the state-of-the-art technology for multilayer PWBs is completed.
  • A comprehensive printed circuit board Design Guide is published.
Speakers from the Environmental seminar: In front, Don Dinella, Western Electric, and George Messner, PCK Technology. In back, Jerry Siegmund, MacDermid, and Rod DuBois, Northern Electric.
Speakers from the Environmental seminar: In front, Don Dinella, Western Electric, and George Messner, PCK Technology. In back, Jerry Siegmund, MacDermid, and Rod DuBois, Northern Electric.

1971

"Measles" on printed circuit boards continues to be an acceptability issue for the industry, particularly in a down market. Measles rejects can cause a serious blow to struggling companies. As a result, IPC technical committees organize an all-out campaign to understand and address the measles issue.

  • All IPC policies and procedures are organized into a policy manual.
  • George Messner, PCK Technology, presents the results of Multilayer Round Robin III during IPC's semiannual meeting.
  • A cooperative program with Underwriters Laboratories (UL) is established to reduce unnecessary testing of printed circuit board and laminate materials. This activity still continues today.
The experts who served on the historic first "measles" committee. Seated: Frank Papiano, RCA; Dick Castonguay, Mica; Ed Cuneo, Cinch-Graphik; and Chairman Jim Swiggett, Photocircuits. Standing: Arny Andrade, Sandia; George Knox, Uniglass; George Smith, NSA; Charles Moser, Bureau of Engraving; and Dick Sarazin, Norplex.
The experts who served on the historic first "measles" committee. Seated: Frank Papiano, RCA; Dick Castonguay, Mica; Ed Cuneo, Cinch-Graphik; and Chairman Jim Swiggett, Photocircuits. Standing: Arny Andrade, Sandia; George Knox, Uniglass; George Smith, NSA; Charles Moser, Bureau of Engraving; and Dick Sarazin, Norplex.

1972

A major activity by IPC this year is an upgrade of the structure for the development of IPC standards. Recommendations include:

  • Development of a standard format for IPC specifications. The IPC board and TAEC agree that IPC will process all of its standards through the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).
  • Agreement that a mechanism should be in place for formal test data to substantiate data used in IPC specifications. (This eventually leads to the development of an IPC Testing Committee.)
  • A program is initiated to determine which member companies have test resource facilities and would be willing to undertake cooperative testing programs on subjects in which they have an interest.
  • It is recommended that IPC participate more actively in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).
  • Under the chairmanship of Joe Poch, Westinghouse Electric, the Flat Cable Handbook is published.
 
Presidents Award Winners, 1972: Seated: Dick Douglas, Fortin; George Morse, Cinch-Graphik and outgoing President of the IPC; and Don Dinella, Westinghouse Electric. Standing: Glenn Affleck, Hewlett Packard; Frank Powell, Mary Eyelet & Stamping; Howard McDaniel, Westinghouse Electric; Dave Luzadis, Bendix; Herb Schacter, Agard; and Dennis Bossi, Ansley Electronics.

1973

  • IPC Test Methods Manual is published under the chairmanship of George Smith, Department of Defense (DoD).
  • A major report on Measles is presented and later included in IPC-A-600, Acceptability of Printed Boards.
Attendees of the special planning committee for a market seminar were (seated) Dan McMillan, McGraw-Hill; Marv Larson, Bureau of Engraving; and Bill McGinley, Methode; (standing) Meridith Suhr, Collins; Ray Pritchard, IPC; Steve Loud, Owens-Corning; George Messner, Photocircuits; Tom Burke, T.M. Associates; Jeff Montgomery and Charles Hill, Quantum Science; Charles Wolff, Western Electric; Ken Varker, IBM; and Wayne Boucher, The Futures Group. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Attendees of the special planning committee for a market seminar were (seated) Dan McMillan, McGraw-Hill; Marv Larson, Bureau of Engraving; and Bill McGinley, Methode; (standing) Meridith Suhr, Collins; Ray Pritchard, IPC; Steve Loud, Owens-Corning; George Messner, Photocircuits; Tom Burke, T.M. Associates; Jeff Montgomery and Charles Hill, Quantum Science; Charles Wolff, Western Electric; Ken Varker, IBM; and Wayne Boucher, The Futures Group. Click on the picture for a larger image.

1974

  • IPC joins with the National Association of Metal Finishers (NAMF) to interface with the EPA to develop effluent standards impacting all electroplating activities. IPC also participates with NAMF in filing suit against the EPA for their electroplating guidelines.
  • The comprehensive Assembly Joining Handbook is published under chairmen John Figliozzi, IBM; John DeVore, General Electric; and Paul Bud, Electrovert.

 

Members of the board in 1974 included, seated: Henry Kalmus, Sr., Kalmus & Associates; Jim Swiggett, Photocircuits and President of the IPC; Marv Larson, Bureau of Engraving; and Dennis Stalzer, Graphic Research. Standing: Bill McGinley, Methode; Dave Easton, Agard; George Morse, Cinch-Graphik; George Holmes, TRW; Ted Thomas, Ansley, Bill Hangen, Sheldahl; Dick Zens, Electralab; and Bill Guyette, ACD Litton.
Members of the board in 1974 included, seated: Henry Kalmus, Sr., Kalmus & Associates; Jim Swiggett, Photocircuits and President of the IPC; Marv Larson, Bureau of Engraving; and Dennis Stalzer, Graphic Research. Standing: Bill McGinley, Methode; Dave Easton, Agard; George Morse, Cinch-Graphik; George Holmes, TRW; Ted Thomas, Ansley, Bill Hangen, Sheldahl; Dick Zens, Electralab; and Bill Guyette, ACD Litton.

1975

Market research is one of the key membership benefits offered by IPC. IPC officially forms the Technology Marketing Research Council (TMRC), now called the Executive Market and Technology Forum, to provide customized market research and technology trends to TMRC members.

  • A formal program to develop long-range plans is established.
  • IPC co-sponsors a joint industry trade show with the Electrical/Electronics Insulation Conference (E/EIC). (This program continues for three years.)
  • IPC Process Effects Handbook is published under co-chairs Jim Cost, Raytheon, and Jack Bramel, Honeywell.
  • IPC sponsors the first workshop, a PWB design course held at Boston University. Today, IPC conducts hundreds of workshops a year, which address both technical and management topics.
  • Don Dinella, Western Electric, presents data from IPC's first Round Robin Test Program to evaluate the state-of-the-art technology of the additive process.

 

Members of the original TMRC Steering Committee. Seated: Ken Malgren, Norplex; Milt Smith, Westinghouse; Marv Larson, Bureau of Engraving; Don Goffredo, Chemcut. Standing: Steve Hudson, Owens-Corning; Jerry Siegmund and Charles Cobb, MacDermid; Chris Kalmus, Kalmus & Associates; and Jack McFalls, Western Electric.
Members of the original TMRC Steering Committee. Seated: Ken Malgren, Norplex; Milt Smith, Westinghouse; Marv Larson, Bureau of Engraving; Don Goffredo, Chemcut. Standing: Steve Hudson, Owens-Corning; Jerry Siegmund and Charles Cobb, MacDermid; Chris Kalmus, Kalmus & Associates; and Jack McFalls, Western Electric.

1976

  • IPC works with the U.S. Defense Electronics Supply Center (DESC) to review their approach to developing military specifications. In the past, DESC contracted with outside experts to prepare initial drafts, which were then reviewed by a joint government/industry group. DESC agrees to have future drafts prepared by volunteer experts from IPC member companies, thereby providing a better resource for the initial draft and avoiding any cost to the government (i.e., taxpayers).
  • Two special Blue Ribbon Committees are formed on Insulation Resistance and Electromigration.

 

President's Award Recipients: Seated: Irv Ireland, Shipley; Paul Twigg, IBM; Jim Kubik, Hughes; and Gordon Buchi, Ciba-Geigy. Standing; Rene Moser, General Electric; Jack Bramel, Honeywell; Walt Rigling, Martin-Marietta; Bill March, Lawrence Livermore Labs; Tom Sarnowski, Photocircuits, and Jim Dilliplane, Berg. Click on the picture for a larger image.
President's Award Recipients: Seated: Irv Ireland, Shipley; Paul Twigg, IBM; Jim Kubik, Hughes; and Gordon Buchi, Ciba-Geigy. Standing; Rene Moser, General Electric; Jack Bramel, Honeywell; Walt Rigling, Martin-Marietta; Bill March, Lawrence Livermore Labs; Tom Sarnowski, Photocircuits, and Jim Dilliplane, Berg. Click on the picture for a larger image.
1977-1986

1977-1986 Highlights

  • Changes name to the Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits
  • Founds the IPC Hall of Fame
  • Sponsors the First Printed Circuit World Convention (PCWC)
  • Sponsors the first PCB presidents meeting
  • Holds the first TMRC meeting outside of the United States
  • Installs the first computer in the IPC office
  • Elects the first IPC board member from an overseas company
  • 25th Anniversary Meeting attended by more than 1,040 attendees
  • Publishes the first IPC-A-610, Acceptability of Printed Circuit Assemblies
  • Completes the first major study of the market for (EMS) companies
  • Applies for ANSI accreditation
  • Opens membership to contract assembly companies
  • Initiates the SMART Conference and Exhibition with EIA
  • Forms Surface Mount Council (SMC) with EIA
  • Holds first committee meetings in Europe and Asia

1977

At IPC's 20th Anniversary Meeting, IPC officially changes its name to the Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits.

  • IPC Hall of Fame (the highest IPC award) is founded, and Methode's Bill McGinley, the first President of IPC, is the original recipient.
  • The need for a computer that can be used by IPC staff is discussed.
  • Ken Hafften, Bureau of Engraving, and Dwayne Poteet, Texas Instruments, lead a committee that develops an IPC multipurpose test board (IPC-B-25) for validation of process capability.

1978

As one of its first major international events, IPC sponsors the First Printed Circuit World Convention (PCWC), which is held in London. This meeting brings together PWB associations from around the world. IPC, EIPC (European Institute for Printed Circuits), ICT (Institute of Circuit Technology UK), JPCA (Japan Printed Circuit Association), and Printed Circuit Group IMF (Institute of Metal Finishing UK) are sponsors of the first PCWC.

  • The IPC Board creates an expanded Long-Range Planning Committee composed of past Presidents. Their recommendations are presented to the TAEC and the Board of Directors.
  • The Board also forms a special Finance Committee to meet for several days each year to develop a proposed budget for presentation to the entire Board.
  • IPC cooperates with the Joint Electronic Device Engineering Council (JEDEC) to develop standard packaging for LSI chips.
  • A new quarterly statistical program for IPC PWB supplier members begins.
  • IPC sponsors the first major management meeting at the Fall Meeting in San Diego. Rolly Mettler, Circuitwise, chairs the meeting.
Sir Harold Wilson, former Prime Minister of the U.K., addressed our international assemblage, the first PCWC. Click the photo for a larger image..
Sir Harold Wilson, former Prime Minister of the U.K., addressed our international assemblage, the first PCWC. Click the photo for a larger image..

1979

Although environmental issues continue to be high on the IPC agenda, IPC also identifies emerging problems concerning the availability of energy.

  • IPC establishes a policy that requires all IPC standards and specifications to be reviewed every five years and to be either reaffirmed, revised, or withdrawn.
  • IPC introduces its first videotapes for sale.
  • IPC sponsors the first Technology Market Research Council (TMRC) meeting in Munich, Germany.
  • IPC sponsors a statistical marketing meeting in Tokyo.
Members of the newly formed Energy Committee. George Messner, PCK Technology, and Jim Rogers, Digital Equipment, were the original co-chairmen Click the picture for a larger image.
Members of the newly formed Energy Committee. George Messner, PCK Technology, and Jim Rogers, Digital Equipment, were the original co-chairmen Click the picture for a larger image.

1980

IPC works with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) in discussion of their plans for a Certification Program for PWB Manufacturers. IPC also forms a Blue Ribbon Committee to review the impact of rising gold prices and develops seminars and documents on this subject.

  • The U.S. Department of Defense approves IPC-T-50,Terms and Definitions, to supersede MIL-STD-429C.
  • Dave Frisch, Photocircuits, and Don Dinella, Western Electric, present details developed during Round Robin III regarding the state-of-the-art technology of additives.
  • IPC installs its first computer.
  • IPC develops a policy that adds metric dimensions to IPC standards.
Receiving the IPC President's Award: (five in front) Jim Hardman, AMP; Fred Disque, Alpha Metals; John Reust, Beech Aircraft; Foster Gray, Texas Instruments; and Pete Gilmore, Hamilton Standard; (in back) Jim DiNitto, Raytheon; Jack Kerr, USN Electronics; Robert Moore, Sperry; Paul Gould, GTE Sylvania; and Tom Brown, FabriTek. Click the picture for a larger image.
Receiving the IPC President's Award: (five in front) Jim Hardman, AMP; Fred Disque, Alpha Metals; John Reust, Beech Aircraft; Foster Gray, Texas Instruments; and Pete Gilmore, Hamilton Standard; (in back) Jim DiNitto, Raytheon; Jack Kerr, USN Electronics; Robert Moore, Sperry; Paul Gould, GTE Sylvania; and Tom Brown, FabriTek. Click the picture for a larger image.

1981

A highlight of the 1981 IPC meeting in Washington, D.C., is the special evening session where almost 800 members have the opportunity to listen to the wisdom of Dr. W. Edwards Deming.

  • IPC's video department produces 30 new videotapes for members.
  • IPC participates as a joint sponsor of Printed Circuit World Conference II (PCWC II) in Germany.
  • Ralf Gliem, Schoeller & Company (Germany) is elected as the first member of the IPC Board of Directors from an overseas company.
  • The Handbook on Safety in Handling Chemicals is published under Tom Mathias, Digital Equipment.
Left to right: Bernie Kessler, Herb Pollack, Dr. Deming, and Jim DiNitto, who as Program Chairman, had made the arrangement for Dr. Deming to address our members.
Left to right: Bernie Kessler, Herb Pollack, Dr. Deming, and Jim DiNitto, who as Program Chairman, had made the arrangement for Dr. Deming to address our members.

1982

The 25th Anniversary Meeting is held in Boston and is attended by 1,040 members.

  • IPC and the International Society of Hybrid Microelecronics (ISHM) cooperatively publish theHybrid Microcircuit Design Guide.
One of the luncheon sessions from 25th Anniversary Meeting was held in Boston, attended by 1,040 members. Click the picture for a larger image.
One of the luncheon sessions from 25th Anniversary Meeting was held in Boston, attended by 1,040 members. Click the picture for a larger image.

1983

  • A study group is appointed to determine how to coordinate implementation of a new technology called surface mounting. The study group estimates that surface mount technology will impact more than 50 IPC technical committees.
  • IPC again sues the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the requirements for Total Toxic Organics (TTO). The result of the suit is a revision in the requirements for TTO.
  • A new Advanced Packaging Technology Committee is established under the chairmanship of Foster Gray, Texas Instruments.
  • IPC-A-610, Acceptability of Electronic Assemblies, is released. Since 1983, IPC has published more than 200,000 printed copies of this document with hundreds of thousands of electronic file users. The IPC-A-610 is the most published and most referenced standard in IPC's history. Today, in addition to English, the document is also available in Chinese, Danish, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Swedish, Russian, Hungarian, Czech, Romanian and Vietnamese. Future plans call for the document to be published in Japanese and Turkish and possibly in other languages.

 

Presenting at the 1983 Fall Meeting were (left to right) H. Sakata, Matsushita; I. Hishioka, Sharp; K. Tsukanishi, Hitachi Chemical; Y. Yoshikawa, Daisho Electronics; and Dr. Hayao Nakahara.
Presenting at the 1983 Fall Meeting were (left to right) H. Sakata, Matsushita; I. Hishioka, Sharp; K. Tsukanishi, Hitachi Chemical; Y. Yoshikawa, Daisho Electronics; and Dr. Hayao Nakahara.

1984

IPC is the first organization to recognize the importance of a group of companies called contract electronics manufacturers. IPC completes the first major study of the market for the industry, reporting sales of $1.4 billion (non-value add) for U.S. contract manufacturers.

  • Printed Circuit World Convention III (PCWC III) is held in Washington, D.C.
  • An electronic information retrieval program is developed for members.
  • IPC applies for and receives ANSI accreditation as a standards developing organization.
  • IPC members vote unanimously to revise the bylaws to include contract assembly companies as Regular Members.
Key representatives at PCWC III were (seated) Reuben Josephs, Nevin Electric; Rolly Mettler, Circuit-Wise; Theo Passlick, Fuba-Hans Kolbe; and Hitoshi Aizawa, Hitachi Chemical. Standing are members of the Operations Committee: Russell House, Imasa Ltd; Bernie Kessler, Kessler & Associates; Dwayne Poteet, Texas Instruments; Dick Douglas, Hughes Aircraft; Jim DiNitto, Analog Devices; Hayao Nakahara, Photocircuits; George Messner, PCK Technology; Ray Pritchard, IPC; Dieter Bergman, IPC; and Kiyoshi Takagi, Fuj
Key representatives at PCWC III were (seated) Reuben Josephs, Nevin Electric; Rolly Mettler, Circuit-Wise; Theo Passlick, Fuba-Hans Kolbe; and Hitoshi Aizawa, Hitachi Chemical. Standing are members of the Operations Committee: Russell House, Imasa Ltd; Bernie Kessler, Kessler & Associates; Dwayne Poteet, Texas Instruments; Dick Douglas, Hughes Aircraft; Jim DiNitto, Analog Devices; Hayao Nakahara, Photocircuits; George Messner, PCK Technology; Ray Pritchard, IPC; Dieter Bergman, IPC; and Kiyoshi Takagi, Fujitsu Ltd.

1985

Although technology and marketing programs continue to play a major role in programming in IPC, there is also increased interest in management programs. This year, in cooperation with the Wharton School of Finance, IPC conducts East Coast and West Coast Financial Management Seminars.

  • A promotional brochure describing the importance of is published and circulated to member companies, as well as to colleges and universities.
  • With more than 20,000 individuals on the IPC mailing list, it is impossible to send all mailings to everyone at each member company. Consequently, a new category of Participating Member is created. (Membership fee is $200.) Participating members receive the same mailings sent to Official Representatives.
  • Electronic Industries Association (EIA), with IPC, initiates the Surface Mount and Reflow Technology Conference and Exhibition (SMART).

 

 

 Seated: Bob Wright, Midi; Sam Sapienza, Wharton School of Finance; John Misilli, Photocircuits; and Rolly Mettler, Circuit-Wise, were the organizers of the Financial Management Seminars.
Seated: Bob Wright, Midi; Sam Sapienza, Wharton School of Finance; John Misilli, Photocircuits; and Rolly Mettler, Circuit-Wise, were the organizers of the Financial Management Seminars.

1986

Only 15% of PWB panels contain one or more surface mount applications. However, the outlook is for surface mount technology (SMT) to eventually dominate the electronics industry, and there is a tremendous need to share information on this technology.

Because of this need, the Surface Mount Council (SMC), a joint effort between IPC and EIA, is formed. The intent of the council is to gather the most knowledgeable experts from EIA and IPC to identify and create programs to overcome the technological barriers to SMT.

  • The IPC Long-Range Planning Committee targets six areas for programming:
    • International Standards
    • Need to Improve Communications
    • U.S. Regional Meetings/Chapters
    • International Meetings and Seminars
    • Expanding Packaging Activities
    • Format for Semiannual Meetings
  • For the first time, IPC holds meetings in Europe and Asia to review a proposal for a new standard for surface mount land patterns (IPC-SM-782).
  • Recognizing that almost 80 percent of all independent PWB manufacturers have sales of less than $5 million, IPC sponsors management meetings on the East and West Coasts aimed directly at the interests and problems of small PWB manufacturers.
  • Under the leadership of Maynard Eaves, Hewlett Packard, IPC publishes a Quality Evaluation Handbook for PWBs and a comprehensive series of slides.
  • IPC headquarters move to 7380 N. Lincoln Avenue, Lincolnwood, Illinois.

 

The initial group of experts who served on the Surface Mount Council. Click the picture for a larger image.
1987-1996

1987-1996 Highlights

  • Conducts studies and develops a benchmark testing program to evaluate alternatives to CFCs
  • Names Thomas Dammrich as Executive Director
  • Hires a lobbyist in Washington, DC
  • Holds the first Capitol Hill Day
  • Creates new Mission Statement
  • Coins the term Electronics Manufacturing Services Industry (EMSI)
  • Co-sponsors and launches Surface Mount International (SMI) Conference and Exhibition
  • Publishes first comprehensive Benchmarking Study 
    Forms the IPC Designers Council
  • Releases an IPC "Book-to-Bill" ratios for US PWB manufacturers
  • Creates the PWB Supplier Council Management Committee
  • Names first supplier member to the IPC Board (non-voting)
  • Launches IPC Printed Circuits Expo
  • Creates the Assembly Marketing Research Council (AMRC)
  • Publishes first Technology Roadmap
  • Establishes the Interconnect Technology Research Institute (ITRI)
  • Develops the first IPC worker certification program (based on IPC-A-610B)
  • Begins staffing the California Circuits Association
  • Launches IPC Web site and e-mail forums

1987

  • Printed Circuit World Convention IV (PCWC IV) is held in Tokyo, Japan.
  • A survey of membership interest in Europe is followed up with an IPC meeting in Zurich to discuss how IPC can best serve European members.
  • Working with the International Society of Hybrid Microelectronics (now called IMAPS), IPC initiates the Hybrid Marketing Research Council to develop market statistics and technology trends.
  • IPC determines that there should be an expanded structure for technical activities to provide a separate section for interconnections and packaging.
Participants in the "best of" series on laminates were (seated) Sid Kimber, Digital Equipment; Steve Gurley, Rogers; Tony Hilvers, IPC; and Joe Berkowitz, Mica; (standing) Dieter Bergman, IPC; Dwayne Poteet, Texas Instruments; Jack Bramel and Dave McGowan, Polyclad; and John Lampe, Martin-Marietta. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Participants in the "best of" series on laminates were (seated) Sid Kimber, Digital Equipment; Steve Gurley, Rogers; Tony Hilvers, IPC; and Joe Berkowitz, Mica; (standing) Dieter Bergman, IPC; Dwayne Poteet, Texas Instruments; Jack Bramel and Dave McGowan, Polyclad; and John Lampe, Martin-Marietta. Click on the picture for a larger image.

1988

Two lawsuits are filed against 20 IPC PWB manufacturing companies contending that materials in the laminate (fiberglass) cause cancer. The IPC organizes legal counsel from all 20 companies to act in concert to defend these suits. Because of this strong cooperative effort, both suits are dropped.

  • The DoD 2000 series of soldering standards is a significant step in aligning the multiple standards developed by various government agencies. IPC sponsors workshops throughout the country with representatives from government and industry to reach agreement on the DoD soldering specifications.
Seated: Fred Murphy, Unisys; Susan Mansilla, Robison Labs; Leo Lambert, Digital Equipment; Roger Jones, ATandT; Les Hymes, General Electric; and Ray Prasad, Intel. Standing: Werner Engelmaier, AT&T; Steve Hinch, Hewlett Packard; Tom Burke, Venture Strategies; John Endee, departing IPC President; Walt Cavender, Quality Circuits; and Paul McNamara, Aeroscientific, received the 1988 President's Award.
Seated: Fred Murphy, Unisys; Susan Mansilla, Robison Labs; Leo Lambert, Digital Equipment; Roger Jones, ATandT; Les Hymes, General Electric; and Ray Prasad, Intel. Standing: Werner Engelmaier, AT&T; Steve Hinch, Hewlett Packard; Tom Burke, Venture Strategies; John Endee, departing IPC President; Walt Cavender, Quality Circuits; and Paul McNamara, Aeroscientific, received the 1988 President's Award.

1989

The EPA undertakes research to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and seeks experts to develop appropriate evaluation and testing programs. IPC volunteers to conduct these studies and develop a benchmark testing program to evaluate alternatives to CFCs for assembly defluxing.

  • IPC cooperates with DoD on future standards on statistical process controls (SPC) rather than on end product performance.
  • In cooperation with the EIA and the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), IPC publishes a joint document, Standardization and Implementation Requirements for Fine Pitch Technology.
  • A second joint U.S./European meeting is held in cooperation with the EIPC and the Printed Circuit Interconnection Federation (PCIF), in Denmark.
  • Shearson Lehman publishes a scathing research report on the U.S. PWB industry, which sets in motion a series of management programs designed to blunt the report.
Members of the newly formed Energy Committee. George Messner, PCK Technology, and Jim Rogers, Digital Equipment, were the original co-chairmen Click the picture for a larger image.
Members of the newly formed Energy Committee. George Messner, PCK Technology, and Jim Rogers, Digital Equipment, were the original co-chairmen Click the picture for a larger image.

1990

Thomas Dammrich, senior vice president for the Illinois Bankers Association, succeeds Ray Pritchard as IPC Executive Director.

  • Printed Circuit World Convention V (PCWC V) is held in Glasgow, Scotland.
  • Work begins on the creation of the World Federation of PWB manufacturers. A meeting is held in September in the U.K., attended by representatives from IPC, the JPCA, and the following European organizations: EIPC, PCIF, and Verband der Deutschen Leiterplattenindustrie BV (VdL).
  • "Audit for Excellence" is launched by IPC for PWB manufacturers. This new program includes a series of audited criteria by which individual companies can measure how they compare to other companies in the industry. Later in the year, this program, which outlines 14 separate categories for leadership, is renamed "Excellence through Leadership."
  • IPC cooperates with the MIT School of Management to study interfirm relationships between PWB manufacturers, their customers, and PWB suppliers.
n the center, Thom Dammrich; on the left, Ray Pritchard; and on the right, Larry Velie, president of the IPC.
n the center, Thom Dammrich; on the left, Ray Pritchard; and on the right, Larry Velie, president of the IPC.

1991

IPC begins in earnest to develop a presence in Washington, D.C., to represent member interests in legislation and regulatory activities.

  • IPC participates with National Association of Metal Finishers (NAMF) in the first Capitol Hill Day. Members meet with U.S. Senators and Congressmen during this day and begin the long journey of familiarizing these representatives with the industry.
  • In recognition of IPC's need to play a stronger role not only in matters of legislation but also in environmental issues, R. Wayne Sayer is retained as the official Washington-based Government Relations Consultant. It is further decided that IPC will hold its own Capitol Hill Days in the future.
  • A $10,000 contribution is authorized to the California Circuits Association (CCA) for their efforts in fighting unreasonable environmental legislation in California.
  • The IPC Board of Directors receives approval from the members for a new Mission Statement:

    The IPC is a United States-based trade association dedicated to furthering the competitive excellence and financial success of its members worldwide who are participants in the electronic interconnect industry.

    In pursuit of these objectives, the IPC will devote resources to management improvement and technology enhancement programs, the creation of relevant standards, protection of the environment, and pertinent government relations.

    The IPC encourages the active participation of all its Regular, Allied, and Associate Members in these activities and commits to full cooperation with all related national and international organizations.

  • The EMS Management Council determines that a more appropriate identity for contract assembly companies needs to be created. They correctly believe that the industry will expand its services from consignment to turnkey, and then to system build. They create and popularize a new name: the Electronics Manufacturing Services Industry (EMSI). Wall Street welcomes this name change, which helps reposition the industry to the investment community.
  • Ninety-one separate ideas are reviewed for expanding IPC programs. These ideas are organized into nine distinct categories:
    • International Programs
    • Membership Definition
    • Management Programs
    • The Need for Excellence
    • Environmental Issues
    • Understanding Members Needs and Cooperation with Related Groups
    • Statistical Process Control (SPC) Programs
    • Technology Requirements
    • Meeting Structure
  • IPC is invited to join the Electronics Roundtable, composed of key representatives of the major electronics industry associations that provide a focus and direction for public policy activities of the U.S. high technology community.
  • IPC is named administrator for OZONET by ICOLP (International Cooperative for Ozone Layer Protection) because of its ability to provide electronic information retrieval. This is a joint project to provide a worldwide resource on eliminating the use of CFCs.
  • Along with EIA, Surface Mount Technology Association (SMTA), and Miller Freeman, IPC cosponsors the first Surface Mount International (SMI) conference and exhibition in San Jose, California. This initial conference and exhibit is a success with 432 booths and more than 4,000 attendees. The event merges the IPC and EIA Smart Conference with the SMTA and Miller Freeman SMTA conference and exhibition.
Some of the key participants in our government relations activity. Left to right, R. Wayne Sayer, IPC Govt. Relations Rep.; Sam Altschuler, Altron; Pat Sweeney, Hadco; Thom Dammrich, IPC; Mary Vessely, aide House Armed Services Com.; Ron Underwood, Circuit Center; and David Lovenheim, Northeast Mid-west institute.
Some of the key participants in our government relations activity. Left to right, R. Wayne Sayer, IPC Govt. Relations Rep.; Sam Altschuler, Altron; Pat Sweeney, Hadco; Thom Dammrich, IPC; Mary Vessely, aide House Armed Services Com.; Ron Underwood, Circuit Center; and David Lovenheim, Northeast Mid-west institute.

1992

The IPC Designers Council is officially formed to meet the needs of individual designers and support better design for manufacturability throughout the industry. Today, the IPC Designers Council, with more than 1,000 members and 33 chapters, is an international network of designers. Its mission is to promote printed board and printed board assembly design as a profession and to encourage, facilitate and promote the exchange of information and integration of new design concepts through communications, seminars, workshops and professional certification through a network of local chapters.

  • To help members address the growing influence of ISO 9000, IPC publishes the General Requirement for Implementation of ISO 9000 Quality Systems.
  • The third European Joint Technical Conference is held in Brussels, Belgium.
  • The results of the first comprehensive IPC Benchmarking Study are published, providing participants an opportunity to measure their capabilities against the best companies in a wide variety of technical and management categories.
  • The 194-page JPCA report, The Printed Circuit Industry in Japan, is translated and published.
  • A biannual wage and salary study is introduced for EMS members.
  • IPC "Book-to-Bill" ratios for U.S. PWB manufacturers are released. The book-to-bill ratio can be used as one of the predictors for the industry and is still watched closely by financial analysts today.
  • Wanting increased influence and programming within IPC, the PWB Suppliers hold an organizational meeting in San Jose. Dan Feinberg, Morton Electronic Materials, is selected as the first chairman of the IPC PWB Suppliers Management Council. During the meeting, the council identifies their initial priorities:
    1. Getting the most for their trade show buck
    2. OEM-Technology Interchange
    3. Recycling
IPC Past President Larry Velie (seated center), Velie Circuits, and IPC Executive Director Thom Dammrich (top left) with 13 IPC President's Awards recipients (standing, left to right): Douglas Sober, Essex Technologies Group; Vern Solberg, SCI; Russel Griffith, Dynaco Corporation; John Kelly, Motorola; Jorgen Svensson, Ericsson Telecom; Robert Keltz, Westinghouse/Fortin; Masamitsu Aoki, Toshiba Chemical Corporation; and (seated, left to right): O. Leigh Mueller, Printed Circuit Builders; Nick Watts, Tektron
IPC Past President Larry Velie (seated center), Velie Circuits, and IPC Executive Director Thom Dammrich (top left) with 13 IPC President's Awards recipients (standing, left to right): Douglas Sober, Essex Technologies Group; Vern Solberg, SCI; Russel Griffith, Dynaco Corporation; John Kelly, Motorola; Jorgen Svensson, Ericsson Telecom; Robert Keltz, Westinghouse/Fortin; Masamitsu Aoki, Toshiba Chemical Corporation; and (seated, left to right): O. Leigh Mueller, Printed Circuit Builders; Nick Watts, Tektronix; Laura Scholten, Optrotech; Robin Sellers, Naval Avionics Center; Lea Jones, EDX; and Joel Yocom, Allied Signal Aerospace. Click picture for a larger image.

1993

Under the direction of the PWB Suppliers Council, IPC announces plans for the first IPC Printed Circuits Expo to be held in 1994 in Boston. A trade show subcommittee of the Council creates a revolutionary philosophy for the event: It should be fair, focused and cost effective by and for the industry. These tenets still guide the exhibition today.

  • To serve the electronics assembly industry's need for market research and technology trends, IPC launches the Assembly Marketing Research Council (AMRC). The Council will be patterned after the highly successful TMRC. The first meeting is held jointly with TMRC in New Orleans in December.
  • Recognizing the importance of providing the industry with the requirements for future technology, IPC holds a workshop in Chicago to begin work on development of the Technology Roadmap. The IPC Technology Roadmap is still published today and is now available free of charge to members.

 

Participants in the initial conference to develop the Technology Roadmap. Click picture for a larger image.
Participants in the initial conference to develop the Technology Roadmap. Click picture for a larger image.

1994

1994 marks a major event in the history of IPC: the opening of IPC Printed Circuits Expo in Boston. More than 1,700 people attend the Expo, which features 275 booths representing 158 companies.

This is not simply an exhibition, however. The event reflects a major effort to provide technology exchange within the industry. IPC Printed Circuits Expo features more than 60 technical papers, 17 workshops, and nearly 100 committee meetings to develop standards for the industry.

  • IPC establishes the Interconnect Technology Research Institute (ITRI), to be headed by D. Marshall Andrews. This was a key recommendation of the IPC Technology Roadmap released in 1993. To keep pace with international technology, it is clear that the US PWB manufacturing industry needs a practical forum to undertake cooperative technical research.
  • The first IPC certification and training program based on IPC-A-610B, Acceptability of Electronic Assemblies, is implemented. Today, IPC-A-610 training is conducted in many languages around the world and has a user base of more than 10,000 instructor certifications. These instructors, in turn, have trained nearly 125,000 engineers, operators, inspectors, buyers and members of management teams. In addition, this certification program has spawned a number of other IPC certification efforts.
  • The IPC Designers Council plans for a new certification program for designers as a means to improve the education and stature of designers in the electronics industry.
  • IPC video expands into interactive multimedia production on CD-ROM, allowing students to learn at their own pace.
  • IPC staff becomes accessible by e-mail.
 Retiring IPC President Sam Altschuler, Altron (far left), presented the 1994 President's Award to the industry experts shown in the photo above. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Retiring IPC President Sam Altschuler, Altron (far left), presented the 1994 President's Award to the industry experts shown in the photo above. Click on the picture for a larger image.
IPC Printed Circuits Expo opens to rousing reviews. From left to right: Jerry Siegmund, Siegmund & Assoc., Peter Sarmanian, Printed Circuit Corp., Sam Altschuler, Altron Incorporated, and Dan Feinberg, Morton Electronic Materials. Click the picture for a larger image.
IPC Printed Circuits Expo opens to rousing reviews. From left to right: Jerry Siegmund, Siegmund & Assoc., Peter Sarmanian, Printed Circuit Corp., Sam Altschuler, Altron Incorporated, and Dan Feinberg, Morton Electronic Materials. Click the picture for a larger image.

 

1995

With the increase in IPC programming, IPC outgrows its building in Lincolnwood, Illinois, and moves to Northbrook, Illinois.

  • To enhance the executive director's ability to work with peers in Washington, D.C., the Board revises the titles of key IPC officers. The title of the chief elected officer is changed from president to chairman of the Board of Directors. The title of the executive director is changed to president.
  • ITRI releases its first technical report:Improvements/Alternatives to Mechanical Drilling of PWB Vias.
  • Membership in IPC hits an all-time high. Two thousand companies/divisions of companies, located in more than 50 countries, are now members of IPC.
  • More than 100 IPC members participate in the development of a Long-Range Strategic Plan approved by the Board in March. The Long-Range Plan defines five specific strategies to carry IPC into the new millennium:
    • Industry Leadership
    • Work Force Development and Training
    • Industry Standards/Technical Assistance
    • Communications, Networking and Participation
    • Global Involvement to Benefit Members
  • IPC is awarded a grant from the State of Illinois, along with Northwestern University, to create an Illinois Electronics Manufacturing Extension Center to aid Illinois manufacturers.
  • In recognition of the excellence of IPC standards, the Department of Defense and ANSI adopt IPC-J-STD-001, J-STD-004, J-STD-005 and J-STD-006.
  • With the increasing interest in the growth and development of China, IPC sponsors a tour of PWB plants in Beijing and Shanghai. In addition, participants in the tour attend the China Printed Circuit Association International Printed Circuit Technological Equipment Exhibition in Shanghai.

 

 

With the increasing interest in PWB developments in China, IPC sponsored a tour of PWB plants in Beijing and Shanghai. In addition, participants in the tour attended the China Printed Circuit Association International Printed Circuit Technological Equipment Exhibition in Shanghai. Click on the picture for a larger image.
With the increasing interest in PWB developments in China, IPC sponsored a tour of PWB plants in Beijing and Shanghai. In addition, participants in the tour attended the China Printed Circuit Association International Printed Circuit Technological Equipment Exhibition in Shanghai. Click on the picture for a larger image.

1996

Printed Circuit World Convention VII is held in May. Once again, technology and management executives from around the world have an opportunity to exchange ideas and information. In addition to the technical paper sessions and the special management sessions for PWB company presidents, there is a first time session for representatives from worldwide organizations to discuss details regarding the size and scope of the PWB markets in all major countries.

  • IPC is successful in having HR537 introduced by Representatives Meeham, Farr and Esho. The bill allows machinery and equipment used in producing PWBs and electronics assemblies to be depreciated in three years instead of five years.
  • IPC establishes a close working relationship with the California Circuits Association and begins staffing the CCA.
  • IPC launches its first Web site www.ipc.org.
  • IPC creates seven e-mail forums including Technet, ComplianceNet and DesignerCouncil. More than 2,000 technologists participate in these forums.
  • The first comprehensive benchmarking study on the market for electronics manufacturing services is completed. The information on financial and operating performance provides an opportunity for EMS members to compare their activities with that of others in the industry..

 

Individuals who attended the special statistical meeting at the World Convention. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Individuals who attended the special statistical meeting at the World Convention. Click on the picture for a larger image.
1997-2006

1997-2006 Highlights

  • Forms the World Electronics Circuits Council
  • Adopts IPC as official name with tag line – Association Connecting Electronics Industries
  • Opens Board of Directors candidacy to all IPC members
  • Merges with the Surface Mount Equipment Manufacturers Association (SMEMA)
  • Launches APEX
  • Issues Board statement on lead free
  • Names Denny McGuirk as IPC President
  • Co-sponsors the International Printed Circuit & Electronics Assembly Fair in China
  • Adopts new long range plan
  • Launches EMS program manager training and certification
  • Forms the Solder Products Value Council
  • Opens office in Shanghai
  • Holds first Sacramento Day
  • Hires a European representative

1997

  • IPC decides to submit all standards to ANSI for approval.
  • The 1996 Market for EMS Providers, published by IPC, reports that the industry showed revenues of $14.5 billion in North America in 1996.
  • IPC reports that rigid PWB production in the U.S. reached $7.2 billion in 1996.
  • IPC receives a "Trophy of Excellence" award for government relations from the American Society of Association Executives
  • IPC creates a conference solely on PWB surface finishes and solderability.
  • The first European PWB financial benchmark survey is released.
  • The Technical Activities Executive Committee votes to post all IPC Test Methods on IPC's Web site.
  • The IPC Board of Directors agrees to include non-voting members elected by the PWB Suppliers Management Council. The Council elects Richard Kessler, LeaRonal, as its first representative.
 Ribbon cutting at IPC Printed Circuits Expo. Don Redfern, Insulectro (center), with Bonnie Fena, Hibbing Electronics Corp. (left) and astronaut Wally Schirra, Peter Sarmanian, Printed Circuit Corp., and Sam Altschuler, Altron Incorporated (right). Click on the picture for a larger image.
Ribbon cutting at IPC Printed Circuits Expo. Don Redfern, Insulectro (center), with Bonnie Fena, Hibbing Electronics Corp. (left) and astronaut Wally Schirra, Peter Sarmanian, Printed Circuit Corp., and Sam Altschuler, Altron Incorporated (right). Click on the picture for a larger image.
Recipients of the Presidents Award at IPC Printed Circuits Expo 1997. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Recipients of the Presidents Award at IPC Printed Circuits Expo 1997. Click on the picture for a larger image.

1998

  • Thomas Dammrich, IPC president, is named to a one-year term as secretariat of World Electronics Circuits Council at their meeting in Wiesbaden, Germany.
  • IPC and the SMTA hold the first Electronics Assembly Expo in October in Providence, Rhode Island. The event features 100 booths and hosts 1,300 attendees.
  • IPC secures funding for the PCB Manufacturing Technology Center at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama.
  • IPC (formerly known as the Institute of Printed Circuits and later as the Institute for Interconnecting and Packaging Electronic Circuits) changes its name to the initials "IPC" with the identifier "Association Connecting Electronics Industries."
  • The last Surface Mount International Conference and Exhibition is held in August in San Jose.
  • Driven by IPC, the "Printed Circuit Investment Act of 1998" is introduced in the U.S. House and Senate. While introducing the bill, Florida Senator Connie Mack says: "Printed wiring boards and assemblies are literally central to our economy as they are the nerve centers of nearly every electronic device." The Act allows manufacturers to depreciate their equipment in three years instead of five years.
 IPC Printed Circuits Expo 1998.
IPC Printed Circuits Expo 1998. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Presidents Meeting at IPC Printed Circuits Expo, with (left to right) Rolly Mettler, Circuit-Wise, Dale Blanchfield, the Bureau Electronics Group, Stephen Mettler, Circuit-Wise, Joel Yocom, Litchfield, and Ren Sanscrainte, Pentex Schweizer. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Presidents Meeting at IPC Printed Circuits Expo, with (left to right) Rolly Mettler, Circuit-Wise, Dale Blanchfield, the Bureau Electronics Group, Stephen Mettler, Circuit-Wise, Joel Yocom, Litchfield, and Ren Sanscrainte, Pentex Schweizer. Click on the picture for a larger image.

1999

  • The IPC Board of Directors publishes a position statement on the growing concern over lead-free legislation. The Board's position: "… all available scientific evidence and U.S. government reports indicate that the lead used in U.S. printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing and electronic assembly produces no significant environmental or health hazards. Nonetheless, in the opinion of IPC, the pressure to eliminate lead in electronic interconnections will continue in the future from both the legislative and competitive sides." A lead-free roadmap begins at IPC's fall meeting.
  • The Board of Directors eliminates IPC membership categories of regular, allied and associate members, resulting in eligibility of any individual from any IPC member company to the IPC Board of Directors.
  • IPC merges with the Surface Mount Equipment Manufacturers Association (SMEMA) to form a new group called the IPC SMEMA Council, an IPC operating division. Steve Hall, BTU International, becomes the group's first chairman. In addition, IPC amends its bylaws to provide voting representation on the board for both SMEMA and for the IPC PWB Suppliers Council. Gerhard Meese, Universal, joins the Board as the SMEMA Council representative.
  • Technet, IPC's e-mail peer-to-peer forum, surpasses 1,700 subscribers.
  • IPC releases the GenCAM (Generic Computer Aided Manufacturing) standard, a robust data description format that will replace limited Gerber files.
  • A certification program on rework and repair training, based on the IPC-7711 and IPC 7721 assembly rework and repair specifications, is launched.
  • The Department of Defense cancels 11 military specifications and authorizes their replacement with IPC documents.
  • IPC President Thomas Dammrich resigns to head the National Marine Manufacturers Association.
  • 580 designers have passed the IPC Designer Certification exam.
 Speaker Rep. Phil Crane (R-IL) addresses attendees of Capitol Hill Day 1999. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Speaker Rep. Phil Crane (R-IL) addresses attendees of Capitol Hill Day 1999. Click on the picture for a larger image.
On the show floor at IPC Printed Circuits Expo 1999. Click on the picture for a larger image.
On the show floor at IPC Printed Circuits Expo 1999. Click on the picture for a larger image.

2000

  • Denny McGuirk, head of the National Fluid Power Association, becomes IPC's third president in January.
  • IPC launches the SMEMA Council's Electronics Assembly Process Exhibition and conference (APEX) at the Long Beach Convention Center in March. Three hundred and thirty-seven exhibitors fill more than 140,000 square feet of floor space and 5,700 attendees visit the exhibition. General H. Norman Schwarzkopf (Ret.) delivers the keynote address to a standing room only crowd.
  • U.S. customs officials are trained by IPC to recognize PWBs and substrates, alleviating years of problems with misclassifications and suspect import data.
  • IPC Printed Circuits Expo attracts 309 exhibitors and 4,200 attendees.
  • To keep up with changes, the Technical Activities Executive Committee votes to remove test methods from printed standards and instead place them online.
  • With the rise of the Internet, reverse auctions for printed boards appear, along with Internet portals intent on squeezing costs from the supply chain. IPC forms an e-business and also Supply Chain Committee to acquaint members with Internet supply chain issues. The committee releases a white paper, The Myths of E-commerce.
  • IPC publishes IPC-7095, Design and Assembly Process Implementation for BGAs.

 


New IPC President Denny McGuirk with keynote speaker Norman Schwarzkopf.
New IPC President Denny McGuirk with keynote speaker Norman Schwarzkopf.
Ribbon cutting at the first APEX. From left to right: Bob Balog and Steve DeCollibus, Speedline Technologies, Jim Donaghy, Sheldahl, Inc., Deny McGuirk, IPC, Bonnie Fena, K-Byte-Hibbing Manufacturing, Gerhard Meese, Universal Instruments, Ron Underwood, Circuit Center, Steve Hall, EKRA America, Stan Plzak, Pensar Corp., Leo Reynolds, Electronic Systems. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Ribbon cutting at the first APEX. From left to right: Bob Balog and Steve DeCollibus, Speedline Technologies, Jim Donaghy, Sheldahl, Inc., Deny McGuirk, IPC, Bonnie Fena, K-Byte-Hibbing Manufacturing, Gerhard Meese, Universal Instruments, Ron Underwood, Circuit Center, Steve Hall, EKRA America, Stan Plzak, Pensar Corp., Leo Reynolds, Electronic Systems. Click on the picture for a larger image.

2001

  • To avoid millions of dollars in compliance costs for the PWB industry, IPC swiftly organizes opposition to the EPA's "Effluent Limitation Guidelines for Metal Products and Machinery." The EPA subsequently abandons these guidelines.
  • PWB shipments for March 2001 decrease 14.6 percent over March 2000 while orders decrease 51.4 percent.
  • IPC ends its relationship with its lobbyist in Washington and brings the function in-house with a full-time director.
  • EMexcess, a searchable database for components, is launched.
  • The IPC Board votes to close the Interconnection Research Technology Institute because of a lack of industry support.
  • A "Needs Assessment and Member Loyalty" survey concludes that IPC members are satisfied with services and programs. The most highly rated services are standards, market research and training/certification.
  • Based on "Focus-on-the-Future" member meetings and the membership survey, the IPC Board adopts a new long-range plan, which include the following objectives:
    • Establish the IPC as the recognized global association for the electronics interconnection industry.
    • Strengthen IPC's position as the industry's worldwide standards-setting organization.
    • Expand the reach of IPC to all membership segments.
    • Enlarge IPC's global data collection, analysis and dissemination process.

 

On the show floor at APEX 2001
On the show floor at APEX 2001.
Keynote session at IPC Printed Circuits Expo 2001.
Keynote session at IPC Printed Circuits Expo 2001.

2002

  • IPC-A-620, Requirements and Acceptance for Cable and Wire Harness Assemblies, is published. The document is well received and in its first year becomes one of IPC's most widely used standards.
  • IPC launches EMS program manager training and certification.
  • Executives from global solder manufacturers are organized into the Solder Products Value Council. The group forms a subcommittee to "resolve the confusion of alloy choice" for lead-free solders.
  • The U.S. Department of Defense adopts IPC-A-610.
  • As the industry begins to focus on the European Union's Restriction of Hazardous Substances, IPC and JEDEC jointly organize a conference on lead-free technology in San Jose. Nearly 300 technologists attend.
  • IPC participates at the third JISSO International Council Meeting in San Jose where technical volunteers from associations from Japan, the U.S. and Europe work toward agreement on standards adoption and use.
  • IPC opens a representative office in Shanghai, China. IPC President Denny McGuirk notes, "This is the first of many steps IPC plans to take in seeing that our long-range plan comes to fulfillment."
  • The U.S. Department of Commerce, under its Market Development Cooperator Program, confers a grant that is intended to support IPC's efforts to promote the adoption and use of IPC standards in China.
  • Congress passes realistic depreciation under President Bush's "Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002." This act includes a bonus of a 30 percent first year depreciation allowance for newly qualified capital investments.

 

Members of the IPC-A-620 committee.
Members of the IPC-A-620 committee. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Four individuals were presented with President's Awards for their dedication to IPC and the industry. From left to right, Jeff Ferry, Circuit Technology Center, Inc.; Peggi Blakley, NSWC - Crane; IPC President Denny McGuirk, Daniel Foster, Soldering Technology International; and Karen Tellefsen, Alpha Metals.
Four individuals were presented with President's Awards for their dedication to IPC and the industry. From left to right, Jeff Ferry, Circuit Technology Center, Inc.; Peggi Blakley, NSWC - Crane; IPC President Denny McGuirk, Daniel Foster, Soldering Technology International; and Karen Tellefsen, Alpha Metals.

2003

  • The Printed Board Process Capability, Quality and Relative Reliability database, a joint effort between IPC and Conductor Analysis Technology, Inc. continues to gain OEM acceptance. The program provides quantitative data to compare the capability, quality, and reliability demonstrated by printed circuit board suppliers on test boards. IPC and CAT, Inc. expect the program to reduce PWB qualification costs for board manufacturers.
  • The first project on liquid crystal polymers is launched by the Electronic Interconnection Center for Excellence. The center is a partnership formed by IPC and the Naval Surface Warfare Center — Crane Division to increase PWB research and development in the United States.
  • IPC California Circuits Association holds its first "Capitol Hill Day" in Sacramento.
  • IPC and the Hong Kong Printed Circuit Association co-produce the first International Printed Circuit and Electronics Assembly Fair in September in Guangzhou, China.
  • In spite of the political and economic climate, IPC Printed Circuits Expo attracts 3,000 visitors to Long Beach in March. Five days later, IPC APEX in Anaheim attracts 5,000 attendees.
  • After 28 long months, the IPC printed circuit board book-to-bill remains above the 1.0 mark for three straight months for the first time since March 2000. However, U.S. rigid PWB production in North America falls to $4.4 billion in 2003.
  • Over 100 technologists attend IPC's first conference on embedded passives.
  • IPC and Soldertec produce their first European lead-free technical conference in Brussels.
  • IPC urges membership support for "Buy America" provisions contained in the U.S. House of Representatives version of the fiscal year 2004 Defense Authorization Bill. Sixty-seven IPC members contact the Senate co-authors of the bill in support of its passage.
  • 2,000 designers successfully become Certified Interconnect Designers through IPC's designer certification program.
  • IPC standards become available for download through IPC's online store.

 

 

On the APEX 2003 show floor
On the APEX 2003 show floor.
Participants in the 2003 IPC Printed Circuits Expo Innovative Technology Showcase
Participants in the 2003 IPC Printed Circuits Expo Innovative Technology Showcase. Click on the picture for a larger image.

2004

  • IPC-2581, Generic Requirements for Printed Board Assembly Products Manufacturing Description Data and Transfer Methodology, is released. This document ends the war over competing data transfer formats and unites the industry with a single standard for data interchange.
  • IPC and other standards-setting organizations file an amicus (friend of the court) brief in support of Infineon and JEDEC versus Rambus Technologies. The landmark case tests the boundaries of patent disclosure during the standards-setting process. Two years later, the court rules in favor of Infineon and JEDEC.
  • Designers Summit becomes part of IPC Printed Circuits Expo and APEX.
  • To rave reviews from the industry, IPC co-locates IPC Printed Circuits Expo, APEX and the Designers Summit in Anaheim.
  • IPC hires a European representative to support IPC members and programs in Europe.
  • The core of IPC documents describing manufacturing and acceptability for printed wiring boards, revision B of IPC-6012, Qualification and Performance Specification for Rigid Printed Boards, and revision G of IPC-A-600, Acceptability of Printed Boards, are released. In all, 17 new standards or revisions are released throughout the year.
  • In response to the growing concern of the lead free implementation dictated by the European Union's Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) requirements, IPC launches a new lead free information Web site. The high costs of raw materials prompt IPC to begin posting raw materials' costs, including gold, copper, tin, silver, nickel, lead and indium.
  • IPC holds several "Let's Talk" meetings to solicit comments from IPC members on the Long-Range Plan.
  • IPC holds its first interim standards meeting in China in December during the joint IPC/Hong Kong Printed Circuit Association conference and exhibition. Several IPC standards for both PWBs and assemblies are discussed during the meeting.
Dieter Bergman was honored for 30 years of service to IPC at IPC Printed Circuits Expo in 2004
Dieter Bergman was honored for 30 years of service to IPC at IPC Printed Circuits Expo in 2004. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Theresa Rowe, AAI (front) at a standards development committee meeting at the IPC shows. Click on the picture for a larger image.
Theresa Rowe, AAI (front) at a standards development committee meeting at the IPC shows. Click on the picture for a larger image.

 

2005

  • IPC provides the voice of the industry during a National Academies Workshop examining the impact of PWB technology on U.S. military readiness.
  • The blockbuster revision D to the IPC-A-610 andRequirements for Soldered Electrical and Electronic Assemblies (J-STD-001) are released. Although both documents contain lead-free criteria, every criterion is reviewed and updated as needed.
  • The co-located IPC Printed Circuits Expo, APEX and Designers Summit takes place in February in Anaheim, along with a successful Electronic Circuit World Convention 10.
  • Sentry Insurance partners with IPC to provide insurance for EMS and PWB companies.
  • With the significant drive for lead free products, the IPC Board of Directors adds a fifth objective to the Long-Range Plan: "Position IPC as the Source of Assistance for Compliance Issues for Lead-Free and RoHS Regulatory Compliance." In other action, the board removes the "designated" seats held by suppliers. The message, which the board sends is "rather than they (the suppliers) being short-changed, they have arrived and are full partners in the association."
  • IPC Solder Products Council issues a final reliability research report on the tin/silver/copper family of lead-free solder alloys. The report recommends SAC 305 as the solder paste alloy of choice.
  • A technology interchange, organized by the IPC PCB Suppliers Council, takes place at Motorola.
  • Nineteen designers at Huawei Technologies in Shenzhen, China, become the first Certified Interconnect Designers in China.

 

 

 

The IPC-A 610 and IPC-J-STD-001 committees celebrate the release of their new revision.
The IPC-A 610 and IPC-J-STD-001 committees celebrate the release of their new revision. Click on the picture for a larger image.
IPC Printed Circuits Expo and APEX co-locate for the first time.
IPC Printed Circuits Expo and APEX co-locate for the first time.

2006

  • Responding to the global need for a streamlined and standardized materials declaration system, IPC releases IPC-1752, Materials Declaration Management. One of the fastest released documents IPC's history, it has been downloaded by more than 10,000 people in 70 countries.
  • With IPC's site membership becoming problematic in an Internet age, IPC creates telecommuter memberships for individuals working remotely for member sites.
  • The new OEM Critical Components Council released its first IPC standard: IPC-9591, Performance Parameters (Mechanical, Electrical, Quality and Reliability) for Air Moving Devices. With the use of a content expert, the standard is developed in nine months. During 2006, the Council also begins work on lithium-ion batteries and power conversion.
  • In recognition of the dramatic changes in the industry, the TMRC is reshaped and relaunched as the Executive Market and Technology Forum. The Forum will formally expand IPC's market research globally, increase electronics assembly coverage, and commission in-depth studies from consultants on timely topics. In June, the group holds its first research conference in Asia, in Hong Kong.
  • In addition, amid the unrelenting quest for global data, IPC launches a global PCB statistical program partnering with seven other PCB associations under the auspices of the World Electronic Circuits Council (WECC).
  • IPC launches Certification for the RoHS Lead-Free Electronics Assembly Process Capability Program, an audit program for lead-free implementation and validation. Solectron in Charlotte, North Carolina, is the first site certified.
  • Translation becomes a key focus. During 2006, IPC-A-610D and its certification program are translated into seven languages. Two popular desk reference manuals are translated into Swedish.
  • In China, interest in training and certification continues to grow. By mid-2006, more than 200 trainers and 19 designers have been certified in three years. The training materials for IPC-A-610D and IPC-A-600G are translated into Chinese in 2006.

 

 

Ribbon cutting 2006
Ribbon-cutting at the IPC shows in 2006. Click on the picture for a larger image.
 Materials Declaration conference in June 2006.
Materials Declaration conference in June 2006. Click on the picture for a larger image.
2007-2016

2007-2016 Highlights

  • IPC celebrates golden anniversary, 50 years of service to industry
  • IPC launches IPCWorks Asia and IPC Midwest Conference & Exhibition.
  • IPC China office moves to new location in Shanghai, expanding access to more of IPC’s programs.
  • IPC establishes the IPC OEM Critical Components Council Steering Committee, comprising representatives from Dell, IBM, Lenovo, Hewlett Packard, Cisco Systems, Alcatel-Lucent and

2007

IPC celebrates its 50th Anniversary

IPC celebrates its 50th anniversary - banner
  • More to come! Stay with us for the next 50 years!

2008

  • The Electronic Components Association (ECA), IPC and JEDEC join forces to develop IPC-J-STD-075, Classification of Non-IC Electronic Components for Assembly Processes, addressing problems that arose from the adoption of lead-free solder.

  • IPC launches its online Presentation Library, complete with live audio recordings and PowerPoint® visuals from selected conferences and meetings and made these audio/slide presentations available to members only on the IPC Web site.

  • IPC, along with several other associations sign a letter urging state agencies to adopt final definition of solid waste (DSW) rule. A win-win situation for industry and the environment, the DSW rule excludes secondary materials from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations if the materials are recycled according to specific conditions set forth in the rule. This exemption will allow listed hazardous wastes, under RCRA, to be recycled instead of disposed of in a landfill.

 
 
 
 

2009

  •  IPC delivers EMS program manager courses for first time in Chinese.

  • IPC China forms management councils that mirror its North American counterparts: Solder Products Value Council, electronics manufacturing services, original equipment manufacturers, and surface mount equipment manufacturers.

  • Yury Kovalevsky, IPC’s Russian representative, comes on board. Among his responsibilities, Yury facilitates the translation of IPC standards into Russian, supports standards development activities in the region and serves as liaison to member companies. He also organizes seminars and events and supports existing training, certification activities and distributors in the region.

  • IPC urges the Department of Defense (DoD) to speed up the appointment of a (PCB) Executive Agent, as mandated in the FY 2009 National Defense Authorization Act. Over halfway into the year, the Navy is designated as the Executive Agent (EA) with a responsibility to oversee the development and implementation of a PCB and interconnect technology roadmap for DoD. IPC continues to urge DoD and Congress to fund the PCB EA program.

 
 
 
 

2010

  • IPC releases IPC-1601, Printed Board Handling and Storage Guidelines. The industry's sole standard on the handling, packaging and storage of printed boards, IPC-1601 provides users with guidance on how to protect printed boards from contamination, physical damage, solderability degradation, electrostatic discharge and moisture uptake. The document covers all phases of production, from the manufacture of the bare printed board, through delivery, receiving, stocking, and soldering.

  • IPC's Solder Products Value Council (SPVC) and EHS Steering Committee record a victory when they successfully persuaded Canada not to restrict five rosin-containing substances from all products manufactured or sold in the country under the Chemicals Management Plan. Rosin is a key ingredient in solder.

  • IPC's first hand-soldering championship was successfully launched at the HKPCA/IPC show with 44 contestants participating in the competition.

  • IPC opens an office in Beijing to provide additional support for companies in North China. The Beijing office staff supports government relations programs in Beijing and works with industry members regarding use and implementation of IPC standards.

  • To provide more training and association services to the Indian electronics manufacturing industry, IPC opens its first office in South Bangalore, India not too far from the well-known Electronics City.
 
 
 
 

2011

  • IPC standards collaboration took a major step forward with the introduction of KAVI Workspace, an online collaboration system for standards development committees.

  • IPC tirelessly advocates for the specific articulation of PCB designs on the USML. IPC strategically raises the profile of this issue through outreach to Capitol Hill and key officials at the Departments of State, Defense and Commerce. In response to proposed revisions to the USML Category VIII, (aircraft), IPC's comments to the State Department emphasize that printed board designs for Category VIII equipment contain significant amounts of information in PCB design data.

  • IPC releases IPC-7093, Design and Assembly Process Implementation for Bottom Termination Components. This standard describes the critical design, assembly, inspection, repair, and reliability issues associated with bottom termination components (BTCs) whose external connections consist of metallized terminals that are an integral part of the component body. It represents an important step in standardizing an increasingly popular component type.

  • After 12 years as the president and CEO of IPC, Denny McGuirk resigns to accept a new position as president and CEO of SEMI.

 

 
 
 
 

2012

  • When does a technology become mature enough to be ready for standardization?  In the case of printed electronics, 2012 was that year. IPC releases, IPC-4921, Requirements for Printed Electronics Base Materials, which covers requirements for base materials used in printed electronics. Whether base materials are plastic, paper, glass or ceramic, IPC-4921 defines material characteristics used for substrates.

  • IPC's market research department continues to expand and enhance the wealth of data available to IPC members, which aid in business decision-making, planning and forecasting. IPC expands participation in its statistical programs for the North American PCB and EMS industries, and for the global EMS, assembly equipment, solder, laminate and process consumables industries and publishes seven major market studies.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) issue a final rule implementing Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act requiring publicly traded companies to provide extensive reports to the SEC if their products contain "conflict minerals" from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). IPC focuses on educating its members about the requirements and helping develop standards and other tools to aid compliance.

  • In April, John Mitchell is appointed president and CEO; In October, Raymond Foo joins IPC as Southeast Asia Representative; In October, Sanjay Huprikar is hired as vice president of member success; In December, Philip S. Carmichael is named president of IPC China.

  • IPC China celebrates 10 years of service to the electronics manufacturing industry.

 

 
 
 
 

2013

  • For the electronics assembly industry, IPC pushes the envelope and expands its presence into final assemblies with its first box build standard. IPC-A-630, Acceptability Standard for Manufacture, Inspection and Testing of Electronic Enclosures. The standard provides guidance for component application engineers on materials and processes used in top-level assembly builds.

  • The design community experiences two significant IPC accomplishments in 2013. The Certified Interconnect Designer (CID) program is renewed to be in sync with IPC’s best-selling design standard, IPC-2221B, Generic Standard on Printed Board Design. And, the design community gains operational efficiency from the release of the "B" version of IPC-2581, Generic Requirements for Printed Board Assembly Products Manufacturing Description Data and Transfer Methodology. A consortium of companies rallies around this standard to make it the electronics industry defacto standard for transferring design data into manufacturing data. IPC-2581B aggregates all elements of a design into a single file that results in improved speed and efficiency of transmission to board manufacturers.

  • IPC's Multimedia Training department takes a giant step forward by moving its entire training library to an online distribution system, enabling online streaming of training.
    IPC develops a new Validation Services program which provides auditing services to certify manufacturing sites and products in accordance with IPC standards -- IPC's first venture into establishing a network of certified suppliers around the globe.

  • IPC publishes Conflict Minerals Due Diligence Guide to help companies establish and execute effective conflict minerals programs that meet the requirements of the new SEC regulation.

  • IPC makes a major investment in its government relations program, appointing John Hasselmann as its new vice president of government relations.

  • IPC Greater China undertakes a program to focus on membership growth. Each IPC member has a dedicated "relationship manager" who is a key IPC employee. The success of this program is realized in Greater China's significant membership growth of more than 45 percent in 2013. Current membership now represents nearly 15 percent of IPC's worldwide membership.

  • With IPC representative Raymond Foo located in Bangkok, IPC increases its activities in both East Asia and Southeast Asia. IPC organizes and hold sponsored hand soldering competitions in Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. The competition in Korea sets record attendance with more than 120 competitors.

  • The APEX brand is brought to India in 2013 with the launch of IPC APEX India in Bangalore. More than 1,000 industry delegates attend the event which includes a technical conference, workshops and exhibition. IPC APEX India also features hand soldering and PCB design competitions.

 
 
 
 

2014

  • IPC Certification focuses on developing and successfully launching the CQI (Certification Quality Initiative). CQI deploys new security features and advanced testing delivery mechanisms focused at improving quality and maintaining the integrity of IPC’s certification program.

  • The Validation Services program continues to expand and grow in 2014. A total of 14 QML audits are completed in and the company locations are added to IPC’s list of industry trusted sources. Several new QML programs are created and implemented: J-STD-001/610, Requirements and Acceptability for Soldered Electrical and Electronic Assemblies, the J-STD-001 Space Addendum, IPC/WHMA-A-620, Requirements and Acceptance for Cable and Wire Harness Assemblies, and IPC-1071, Best Industry Practices for Intellectual Property Protection in Printed Board Manufacturing.

  • IPC publishes a conflict minerals data exchange standard that aids business to business communication of important conflict minerals compliance data. IPC-1755 is co-developed with EICC and JEITA to ensure broad adoption of a common industry standard. The data exchange standard is XML schema based, allowing companies to seamlessly and electronically communicate compliance information.

  • IPC successfully advocates for legislative language to be included in draft TSCA reform legislation that clarifies Congressional intent to exempt byproducts from TSCA regulations. EPA’s implementation of TSCA treats byproducts as new chemicals if they are sent for recycling. This narrow interpretation is burdensome, unnecessary, and actually discourages recycling.  IPC member, Brent Grazman, VP Quality at Viasystems, testifies on behalf of IPC at a House subcommittee hearing on TSCA reform legislation.

  • IPC begins work on IPC-1401 standard, a Chinese initiated standard for the development of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) and Green manufacturing China supply chain companies. Chaired by Huawei and vice chaired by Flextronics, development work on this standard gains significant momentum late in the year.

  • IPC APEX South China grows from 40,000 square meters in 2013 to a record of 45,000 square meters in 2014. For the second year, it is the largest show in our industry worldwide with 39,836 participants and 520 companies with 2,205 booth equivalents comprising 410,000 square feet of show floor space.

  • The IPC Europe High Reliability Forum in Dusseldorf, Germany is well received by attendees. During this conference, IPC kicks off standards activity for an automotive industry addendum to IPC 6012, Qualification and Performance Specification for Rigid Printed Boards.

 
 
 
 

2015

  • IPC Certification focuses on enhancing the Online Certification Portal (formerly known as CQI) and concentrates efforts on using customer feedback to optimize the user experience and provide quick response times to questions on this new system for delivering online certification exams. The Online Certification Portal reaches an all-time record usage, since the roll out, in the fourth quarter with more than 150,000 active sessions.

  • Utilizing the mantra of “Push to Evolve,” IPC works to drive awareness of the benefits of IPC training and certification.

  • IPC launches the Enterprise membership category as a cost-effective way for companies with multiple locations to increase their overall engagement in IPC’s core activities such as standards, education, advocacy and solutions.

  • To maximize the value of our members, IPC adds the position of Member Success Advocate (MSA) to its staff. MSAs are responsible for addressing any questions members may have, as well as helping them navigate through IPC's products and services. This provides members a dedicated point of contact for ensuring that IPC is meeting all their needs.

  • IPC released its Global Policy Framework for 2015, outlining its top public policy priorities to promote a strong manufacturing economy.

  • Opening a new phase in its efforts to educate policy makers on issues that affect the electronics manufacturing industry, IPC launches a new website and recruitment campaign for the IPC Political Action Committee (IPC PAC).

  • In 2015, IPC reaches an all-time high number of IPC Distributors and Training Centers based in Europe, further establishing its presence and support in European countries.
 
 
 
 

 

2016

  • Through its dedication to improving educational opportunities for industry employees, IPC rolls out IPC EDGE. This online learning platform provides education and training courses on topics ranging from IPC Essentials (an introduction to the electronics industry) to a new ESD industry certification program.

  • IPC opens a new office in Brussels to offer its members increased advocacy support, standards development activities, and educational opportunities in the European Union.

  • IPC hosts its first-ever “IMPACT” advocacy event in Brussels, bringing together industry executives and EU policymakers to discuss issues of mutual concern. IMPACT Europe 2016 begins with a breakfast roundtable discussion on the effects of the REACH regulation on the electronics industry. Later, a panel discussion provides opportunity to discuss the growing skills gap in Europe.

  • The Validation Services program achieves new success. On top of certifying more organizations throughout the year, Validation Services completes its first Qualified Manufacturer List Certification in Europe. Two new certification programs are introduced, including a Qualified Manufacturers Listing (QML) for J-STD-001/IPC-A-610 and a Qualified Products Listing (QPL) for IPC-4101.

  • In line with providing solutions for tomorrow’s industry, IPC works alongside 40 member companies ranging from machine vendors, software vendors, and OEMs that comprise the 2-17 Connected Factory Initiative Subcommittee on a machine data interface standard, “Connected Factory Exchange or CFX” that would enable manufacturers, equipment, device and software suppliers to achieve Industry 4.0 benefits.

  • IPC EDGE curriculum continue to evolves to meet the industry’s growing demands.  To further accomplish this, IPC engages member training centers to develop new course topics. The result of this is a strengthened partnership with authorized IPC Training Centers to deliver the most efficient and effective training possible.

 
 
 
 

 

2017-Present

2017 - Present

Highlights

  • IPC celebrates 60th Anniversary
  • IPC worldwide membership climbs to an all-time high

2017

  • IPC celebrates 60th anniversary!
  • IPC worldwide membership climbs to an all-time high in 2017 with more than 4,000 member sites in 79 countries as companies in the electronics manufacturing industry continue to acknowledge the strong value of IPC’s product and service offerings. Fueled by double digit percentage growth across Asia, IPC Asia Pacific has nearly 1,000 members and buoyed by IPC’s new office in Brussels, IPC’s member count in Europe has reached 600.
  • More to come! Stay with us for the next 60 years!
IPC History Photo Gallery
Historical photos of IPC Events
IPC History Book
From Vacuum Tubes to Nanotubes: An Amazing Half Century

Blast From the Past
Read about the emergence of electronic circuit technology and printed circuit boards.
Learn More