Collaborate - Modernize - Transform 

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IPC Factory of the Future is a solutions program to lead, assist and guide the electronics manufacturing industry through the next industrial revolution. Solving real business challenges, IPC Factory of the Future programs identify new technologies that modernize industry processes. Several of these new disruptive technologies already exist such as AI-enabled inspection, AI-machine learning, CAD, 3D design, Simulation, 3D printing, and more. IPC connects with these disruptive technology companies, sorts through the technologies and provides a focus and for the electronics manufacturing industry modernization.

IPC is already well-positioned to lead and collaborate with the industry to close the implementation gap of an industry-wide manufacturing modernization. IPC standards on CFX, Cybersecurity, Digital twin, Trusted Supplier, Traceability, 3D design modeling, CFX Validation are delivering in this digital age. IPC education on CFX, APEX Factory of the Future program track, and CFX webinars provide guidance on new technologies. IPC solutions will provide thought leadership and establish a Chief Technologist Council to help lead the industry.

Supply Chain and Factory of the Future
IPC Chief Technologist, Matt Kelly and IPC Chief Economist Shawn DuBravac discuss "Supply Chain and Factory of the Future"
Separating Hype from Reality
IPC Chief Technologist, Matt Kelly and IPC CEO John Mitchell discuss Factory of the Future

Learn how companies are already successfully implementing IPC-CFX

Manufacturers have stated, "IPC-CFX eliminates the most costly and risky barriers for Industry 4.0 adoption, enabling collaboration between all of our machines and systems." 

MES-Based PROCESS CONTROL of Test Machines Using IPC-CFX

IPC-CFX Process Control and Traceability: Real-Time Risk Mitigation in Hand Soldering

MTC Demonstrates Europe's First Electronics Smart Factory Using Legacy Machines, June 16 2020 ... Manufacturing Technology Centre 

Matt Kelly on Tech Talk Thursday
Matt Kelly, IPC's chief technologist talks to Global SMT & Packaging's editor-in-chief Trevor Galbraith about IPC's factory of the future initiative
Factory of the Future
Matt Kelly on the Reliability Matters Podcast
Listen to Matt's discussion with host Mike Konrad
Factory of the Future Standards

IPC Factory of the Future Related Standards

Join a Factory of the Future Standards Committee Today

How Can I Become a Factory of the Future Standards Committee Member


IPC has published four standards related to the Factory of the Future initiative to assist electronics manufacturers with implementing their modernization plans. As an example there is IPC-CFX (Connected Factory Exchange) supporting Industry 4.0 and machine to machine communication. There are three additional standards which are in development and will be published soon. 

Interested in becoming part of the movement to help develop standards for Factory of the Future? Check this out 

 

IPC-2591 Version 1.2 Connected Factory Exchange (CFX)

IPC-2591 Version 1.2 Connected Factory Exchange (CFX)

This standard establishes the requirements for the omnidirectional exchange of information between manufacturing processes and associated host systems for assembly manufacturing. This standard applies to communication between all executable processes in the manufacture of printed board assemblies – automated, semiautomated and manual – and is applicable to related mechanical assembly and transactional processes.

IPC-1791 Trusted Electronic Designer, Fabricator and Assembler Requirement

IPC-1791 Trusted Electronic Designer, Fabricator and Assembler Requirement

This standard provides minimum requirements, policies and procedures for printed board design, fabrication and assembly organizations and/or companies to become trusted sources for markets requiring high levels of confidence in the integrity of delivered products. These trusted sources shall ensure quality, supply chain risk management (SCRM), security and chain of custody (ChoC). Demonstration of the ability to meet and maintain the requirements of this standard as trusted design, fabrication or assembly organization benefits customers that provide end-products for markets desiring a high level of integrity assurance (e.g. commercial, industrial, military, aerospace, automotive and medical).In the context of this standard, the terms trust and trusted are used to reflect a commitment to delivered product and process integrity assurance by printed board designers, fabricators and assemblers.

IPC-1782 Standard for Manufacturing / Supply Chain Traceability of Electronic Products

IPC-1782 Standard for Manufacturing / Supply Chain Traceability of Electronic Products

This standard establishes minimum requirements for manufacturing and supply chain traceability based on perceived risk as agreed between user and supplier (AABUS). This standard applies to all products, processes, assemblies, parts, components, equipment used and other items as defined by users and suppliers in the manufacture of printed board assemblies, as well as mechanical assembly and printed circuit board fabrication. This standard is applicable both for internal traceability (i.e., traceability within the environment in which the product is assembled) and external traceability (i.e., as products and materials are moved between locations as part of their supply chain). Minimum requirements are based on four levels of traceability for materials and processes. These levels can correlate to the IPC Product Classification System (Class 1, Class 2,  and Class 3 and Space/Defense/Medical) and/or another set of categories of compliance, based on the business model/economic needs of the end-use market for the final product (e.g., telecom, aerospace, automotive, medical device, consumer electronics, etc.) or a subassembly within that product.

IPC-2581 Generic Requirements for Printed Board Assembly Products Manufacturing Description Data and Transfer Methodology

IPC-2581 Generic Requirements for Printed Board Assembly Products Manufacturing Description Data and Transfer Methodology

This standard specifies the XML schema that represents the intelligent data file format used to describe printed board and printed board assembly products with details sufficient for tooling, manufacturing, assembly, and inspection requirements. This format may be used for transmitting information between a printed board designer and a manufacturing or assembly facility. The data is most useful when the manufacturing cycle includes computer-aided processes and numerical control machines. The IPC-2581C revision will include general quality of life improvements to the data exchange model, as well as introducing elements necessary for the communication of board impedance characteristics, advanced options for drill and routing features, design for flexible circuits, and DfX measurements.

IPC-1792 Standard for Cybersecurity in the Manufacturing Industry Supply Chain

Standard Under Development

This standard provide s a system for reducing manufacturing supply-chain cybersecurity risks. Within this system, the standard identifies four models (levels) of cybersecurity protection which can be used to assess a manufacturing facility’s cybersecurity model to show existing cybersecurity protections and to identify steps to take to achieve higher cybersecurity models.  This standard is applicable for internal cybersecurity (i.e., within the environment in which the product is assembled) and external cybersecurity (i.e., as products and materials are moved between locations as part of their supply chain). This standard also includes mechanisms for self- or third-party assessment to the four cybersecurity models as well as a mechanism of validation by a certificate authority (CA).

IPC-2551 International Standard for Digital Twins

Standard Under Development

This standard establishes the IPC Digital Twin, which is comprised of the Digital Twin Product,  Digital Twin Manufacturing and Digital Twin Lifecycle frameworks. Within the Digital Twin Architecture, this standard stipulates and defines Digital Twin properties, types, complexities and readiness levels. The IPC Digital Twin includes historical information about a product, including the history of design in terms of revision and engineering changes, and manufacturing information, that many refer to as the Digital Thread. This standard, together with the sectional standards referenced, enables any manufacturer, design organization or solution provider to achieve full application interoperability to create smart value chains, as well as the mechanism to assess their current IPC Digital Twin readiness level. This standard provides all manufacturers with the information and guidance necessary to understand a full Digital Twin, Digital Twin Product, Digital Twin Manufacturing and Digital Twin Lifecycle. This standard also provides information and guidance on how manufacturers can benefit from Digital Twins, how to assess Digital Twin readiness level and how to prepare a factory of any size or production volume to implement a full Digital Twin approach to its factory and/or products.

IPC-2552 Standard for Model Based Design (MBD) for Digital Twin Factories

Standard Under Development

This standard will establish data format standard of model-based design (MBD) of components, printed boards and printed board assemblies, to enable any ODM/OEM to establish physical model of components, printed boards or printed board assemblies for Digital Twin Factories. This standard will also define the data content and format required for the modeling of components, printed boards and printed board assemblies, as well as the purpose for the data content in product design and fabrication. MBD can be shared across the supply chain, significantly improving product design quality, shortening product time to market and reducing research and development costs. This standard will focus on several key areas: Terms and Definitions, MBD Component Library,  MBDs for Printed Boards, MBD of Printed Board Assemblies, Definition of Data Security Sensitivity Level, and incorporating other IPC digital Standards.

Factory of the Future
Chief Technologist Council - Explained