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1957 - 1966

1957-1966 Highlights

  • IPC is founded. Ray Pritchard is hired as executive director.
  • First official IPC meeting takes place
  • Publishes How to Design and Specify Printed Circuits
  • Initiates the first round robin test program
  • Starts monthly statistical program for PWB manufacturers
  • Opens membership to OEMs and government agencies
  • Publishes first IPC standard
  • Publishes IPC-A-600, Acceptability of Printed Wiring Boards
  • Establishes the President's Award
  • Membership opens to overseas companies

1957

In 1957, a new industry is struggling for identity. Etched printed wiring is emerging as a new technology, but there is confusion regarding the process and its potential. Independent printed wiring board (PWB) manufacturers hold several meetings throughout the year to discuss ideas for promoting the growth of their new industry.

That autumn, representatives from six of the major independent PWB manufacturers meet in Chicago to officially form a trade association they call the "The Institute of Printed Circuits." At this meeting, they select Ray Pritchard as executive director and outline the following objectives:

  • Promoting an awareness of the attributes of PWBs versus hand wiring.
  • Developing standards and specifications to provide realistic yardsticks for manufacturers and users to move forward in utilizing products of the new industry.
  • Offering a variety of forums where the industry can exchange information on the technology.
  • Providing the industry with meaningful statistical data on the market and cost studies.
  • IPC's first office is established at 27 E. Monroe Street in Chicago.
Seated: Al Hughes, Electralab; Robert Swiggett, Photocircuits; William McGinley, Methode. Standing: Dick Zens, Printed Electronics Corporation; and Carl Clayton, Tingstol. Also in attendance at this initial meeting: Ray 
				Pritchard, thereafter named the Executive Director of IPC; Gene Jones, Printed Electronics Corporation; and George Hart and Stewart Fansteel, Graphik Circuits Division of United Carr.
Seated: Al Hughes, Electralab; Robert Swiggett, Photocircuits; William McGinley, Methode. Standing: Dick Zens, Printed Electronics Corporation; and Carl Clayton, Tingstol. Also in attendance at this initial meeting: Ray Pritchard, thereafter named the Executive Director of IPC; Gene Jones, Printed Electronics Corporation; and George Hart and Stewart Fansteel, Graphik Circuits Division of United Carr.

1958

An announcement of an organizational meeting in New York is sent to all known PWB manufacturers and suppliers. Forty-one individuals, representing 27 companies, attend. At this session, attendees outline their ideas for plans and programs for the new association and sign up all interested companies.

  • The book How to Design and Specify Printed Circuits is published and eventually sells more than 25,000 copies.
  • A round robin test program is initiated, which will compare plated-through holes with eyelets and grommets.
  • A monthly statistical program for PWB manufacturers begins.
  • Membership is opened to users (OEMs).

1959

The development of the market for "printed circuits" is impeded by Zenith, whose advertising claims that their television sets contain "no printed circuits." IPC cooperates with the National Association of Television Repairmen to undertake a survey, which indicates that printed circuits are indeed reliable.

Later in the year, IPC holds a meeting in New York with representatives from RCA, Westinghouse, and Sylvania to develop a cooperative program to educate users to the advantages of using printed circuits. As the program develops, Zenith drops its advertising slogan and, as a result, IPC does not proceed with the cooperative education program.

  • The first analysis of "costs and profits" in the PWB industry is published.
  • Complimentary memberships are offered to representatives of government agencies involved in preparing standards and specifications.
IPC sponsorship of a Reliability Seminar on Printed Circuit Boards in TV Applications. Seated left to right: Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; John Currier, New England Laminates; and Frank Moch, a representative from NATESA, who reported on the survey results indicating reliability data.
IPC sponsorship of a Reliability Seminar on Printed Circuit Boards in TV Applications. Seated left to right: Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; John Currier, New England Laminates; and Frank Moch, a representative from NATESA, who reported on the survey results indicating reliability data.

1960

By 1960, IPC's semiannual meetings are the focal point of IPC activity. With the new and growing technology, there is a need for an exchange of ideas. IPC encourages the best and the brightest from member companies to present papers at seminars and committee meetings. At this time, more than 100 members are attending the semiannual meetings to share ideas and to work at developing new standards and specifications.

  • The initial standard IPC-D-300, Dimensions and Tolerances for Single- and Double-Sided PWBs, is printed.
  • IPC Technical Review (now IPC Review) is published for IPC members.
  • IPC cooperates with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on standards development.
Chairman of the IPC technical committees. Left to right: Mr. L.A. Gunsaulus, Photocircuits Corp., Chairman of the dimensional Tolerances Committee; Mr. C.G. Kepple, Motorola, Inc., Chairman of the Committee on repairability; Mr. E.E. Wright, Bell Laboratories, Chairman of the Through Connection Commmittee, and Mr. J.E. Currier, New England Laminates Company, Chairman of the Raw Materials Committee.
Chairmen of the IPC technical committees. Left to right: L.A. Gunsaulus, Photocircuits Corp., Dimensional Tolerances Committee; C.G. Kepple, Motorola, Inc., Committee on Repairability; E.E. Wright, Bell Laboratories, Through Connection Commmittee, and J.E. Currier, New England Laminates Company, Raw Materials Committee.

1961

Technology exchange continues to be important to IPC members and plated-through holes are of major importance in expanding the applications for PWBs.

  • IPC releases the movie The Printed Circuit Storywhich is made available to members to promote their products.
  • The first detailed market study is completed, which reveals:
    • $ 50 million sales by independents (merchant) PWB manufacturers
    • $ 80 million worth of PWBs produced by OEMs
    • $130 million total U.S. PWB Market

Independent PWB manufacturers report operating at 60 percent of capacity; 55 percent of their production is for government/military applications.

Speakers at IPC's Fall Technical Symposium. Seated left to right: Mr. W.D. Fuller, Lockheed Electronics Co.; Dr. J. M. Rausch, Bell telephone Laboratories; and Mr. Oscar Vance, Burroughs Corp. Standing: Mr. D.F. Pennie, Remington Rand Univac Division; Mr. G.B. Devey, Spraugue Electric Co.; and R.G. Zensa, Elecrtalab Printed Electronics Inc.
Speakers at IPC's Fall Technical Symposium. Seated left to right: W.D. Fuller, Lockheed Electronics Co.; J. M. Rausch, Bell Telephone Laboratories; and Oscar Vance, Burroughs Corp. Standing: D.F. Pennie, Remington Rand Univac Division; G.B. Devey, Spraugue Electric Co.; and R.G. Zensa, Elecrtalab Printed Electronics Inc.

1962

  • A committee is created to write standards for flexible flat cables.
  • A new committee is formed to develop data on the solderability of printed circuit boards.
  • A joint working group is established with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association and American Society for Testing and Materials to develop data on punching and shearing laminates.
  • A new committee is set up to study multilayer PWBs.
R.L. Swiggett (left0 receiving a plaque from W.J. McGinley in recognition of Mr. Swiggett's leadership and distinguished serve as IPC President in 1961 and 1962.
R.L. Swiggett (left) receiving a plaque from W.J. McGinley in recognition of Swiggett's leadership and distinguished service as IPC President in 1961 and 1962.

1963

By 1963, IPC leadership, with the development of many new committees, subcommittees, and working groups, recognizes the need for better coordination in the standards development process. IPC forms a Technical Planning and Standards Coordinating Committee to oversee technical coordination and make recommendations to the Board of Directors.

  • A comprehensive numbering system is established to identify IPC standards.
  • A Technical Manual is printed, which contains all standards and specifications published by IPC.
  • The first Wage Rate and Fringe Benefits Survey of PWB Manufacturers is published.
  • IPC moves its offices to 3525 Peterson Road in Chicago.
First members of the Standards Coordinating Committee. Seated: Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta; Gene Szukalski, RCA. Standing: Lynn Gunsaulus, Photocircuits; Hugh Medford, Westinghouse Electric; Stark Roberts, IBM; and Dean Stephenson, Amphenol.
First members of the Standards Coordinating Committee. Seated: Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta; Gene Szukalski, RCA. Standing: Lynn Gunsaulus, Photocircuits; Hugh Medford, Westinghouse Electric; Stark Roberts, IBM; and Dean Stephenson, Amphenol.

1964

IPC publishes the first version of IPC-A-600, Acceptability of Printed Boards. This document is still the main source of visual support for the bare board acceptability requirements contained in the IPC-6010 series, and has been revised and updated seven times since 1964.

  • A joint IPC/Government Specifications Steering Committee is formed to coordinate IPC specifications with military specifications.
  • A Raw Materials Roundtable is initiated where members can discuss any problems pertaining to raw materials used in processing PWBs.
 Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta, chairman of the IPC-A-600 committee, with Ken Varker, IBM (left) and Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits (right.)
Bob Matzinger, Martin-Marietta, chairman of the IPC-A-600 committee, with Ken Varker, IBM (left) and Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits (right.)

1965

One of the year's highlights is a plant visit to the IBM facility in Endicott, New York. The tour is part of an IPC seminar on numerically controlled manufacturing systems sponsored by the IPC Multilayer Committee. Nearly 100 IPC members travel to Endicott to participate in the program.

  • The American Association of Association Executives (ASAE) presents its Grand Award to IPC. This award is the highest honor given by ASAE for association programming.
  • The first Round Robin Test Program to evaluate the state-of-the-art technology of multilayer PWBs is completed.
  • IPC concludes a study of various freight rates being applied to products in our industry.
Fall Meeting in Chicago. Click on the picture to see it larger.
Fall Meeting in Chicago. Click on the picture to see it larger.

1966

In 1966, the President's Award is established so that at the conclusion of each two-year term, the outgoing IPC president (now IPC chairman of the Board) can recognize those individuals who have made outstanding contributions to IPC.

  • Membership is opened to overseas companies.
  • A comprehensive multilayer handbook is published.
  • IPC sponsors a marketing seminar to discuss "The Five-Year Outlook for Printed Circuit Applications."
From left Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; Dieter Bergman, Philco-Ford (Technical Director of the IPC since 1974); and George Messner, PCK Technology, have all been elected to the IPC Hall of Fame. Also, on the far right, is Gerry Ginsberg, Philco-Ford, whose death did not allow time to be named to the Hall of Fame.
From left Bob Swiggett, Photocircuits; Dieter Bergman, Philco-Ford;  George Messner, PCK Technology and Gerry Ginsberg, Philco-Ford.